1. Top 10 Signs You Need a New Mattress

    Top 10 Signs You Need a New Mattress

    Your mattress is an essential part of your everyday life, and you put a lot of thought into selecting just the right one for you. So it can be easy—and tempting—to believe that you and your mattress will be together forever. Unfortunately, no matter how amazing your mattress may be, this is one relationship that must come to an end.

    You can expect a good 7-10 years out of a premium mattress, but eventually it will succumb to the wear and tear of supporting your body every night. At that point, it stops providing you with proper support, leading to aches, pains, less-than-stellar sleep—and the need to find a replacement.

    But how do you know for sure when you need a new mattress? Here are 10 telltale signs:

    1. Obvious sagging

    The most visible indication that a mattress needs to be replaced, sagging may as well be an “It’s Time to Replace Your Mattress” sign. It’s also a symptom that applies to all mattress types, as springs break down over time, memory foam gets softer, and the fibers in other materials compress—all of which lead to sagging. Don’t wait for a crater to form in the middle of your bed. Even minor sags of 1-2 inches shouldn’t be ignored, as they can mean a lack of support for the most vulnerable parts of your body.

    2. Quite the impression

    Impression of hand on memory foamThis one applies specifically to memory foam mattresses and can be a bit tricky to decipher. See, memory foam is supposed to “remember” your body and sleeping position (hence the name)—but only to a certain degree. After you get out of bed, the foam should mostly return to its original position. However, over time the cellular structure of memory foam breaks down, becoming softer and losing its ability to bounce back, aka to support you. If your memory foam mattress has a body impression that stays long after you’ve gotten up, or if the impression is deeper than two inches, it’s time to replace it.

    3. The Goldilocks effect

    Memory foam mattress owners should also take note if their mattress becomes too hard or too soft. Because of memory foam’s sensitivity to temperature (the reason that many people “sleep hot” on memory foam mattresses), it will become hard over time when kept in a small room, or soft over time when kept in a warm room. This change in firmness can wreak havoc on your comfort.

    Guy Clutching Pillow Cant Sleep

    4. One lump or two?

    When the padding within the mattress shifts around over time, you may see lumps in your mattress. This uneven density can mean you’re not supported where you’re supposed to be. It can also cause uncomfortable pressure points. Though lumps are more common with lower-quality mattresses, it can also happen with higher-end mattresses that have run their course.

    5. Age is just a number…unless you’re a mattress

    Even if your mattress is showing none of the above signs, if it’s more than seven years old, you should apply some scrutiny to it. Most mattresses will need to be replaced after 7-10 years. Even if you think you’re sleeping fine, there’s a chance that you’ve just become slowly accustomed to a less-than-excellent sleeping experience.

    Man with back pain

    6. What a pain

    Sleep is a time for your body to recover from the stresses it experienced during the day, whether that’s an intense gym session or too much sitting at your desk. So if you wake up with more aches and pains than you had when you went to bed, your mattress is likely the culprit. Because of the gradual degradation and softening of a mattress’s materials, it loses its ability to provide crucial support for vulnerable areas like your neck, low back, and hips. On top of that, as cushioning gets worn down, it can create painful pressure points. When your back is sagging and springs are jabbing your hips, then waking up with aches and pains is inevitable.

    So if you wake up feeling beat up rather than refreshed, chances are your mattress needs to go (this is even more likely to be the case if you wake up with pain and it gets better throughout the day).

    7. Up all night

    If you can’t fall asleep, or frequently wake up during the night and adjust positions, it could be time to replace your mattress. Of course, other things like stress or poor sleep hygiene can keep you up at night, too. But if you’re tossing and turning into the wee hours, chances are your mattress no longer provides you with the proper comfort and you need a new one. If you seem to sleep through the night but still wake up tired, the same may very well be true.

    Pregnant woman with pillow over her head

    8. Sleeping for two

    One of the more exciting reasons for getting a new mattress is becoming pregnant. Because your body is undergoing so many changes during and after pregnancy, a customizable mattress and adjustable bed is a great choice that will provide support during every stage of the journey. Custom support for side-sleeping will help support your belly and prevent back pain during pregnancy, and can be easily changed back to your usual sleep preference afterward. Plus, an adjustable bed makes getting out bed easier when you’re pregnant. It also makes nursing more comfortable and can help protect abdominal muscles after a C-section.

    9. Active allergies

    Over time, most types of mattresses can accumulate allergens like mold, mildew, and dust mites. If you’re allergic to these irritants, that means that your mattress will trigger an allergic reaction. So if you notice yourself sneezing when you get close to the bed or a stuffed up in the morning, it’s probably time to evaluate your mattress situation. When choosing a new mattress, consider hypoallergenic materials like wool or latex.

    Unhappy woman next to sleeping man

    10. It’s not you, it’s me

    Sometimes everything is still perfectly fine with your mattress, but circumstances in your own life necessitate that you get a new one. This could be the case if you sustained an injury, lost or gained a significant amount of weight, or have a new bed partner. If your mattress is still in the prime of its life but you’re not getting the support you need anymore, don’t feel guilty about letting it go—just find a mattress donation location near you.

    Is it time for a new mattress? The leading consumer magazine just rated ours. 


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  2. Sleep and Weight Loss: Why Shut-Eye Is Essential for A Leaner You

    Sleep and Weight Loss: Why Shut-Eye Is Essential for A Leaner You

    There are a couple oft-cited “epidemics” in America, one being obesity, and the other inadequate sleep. Unfortunately, it’s not just attention-grabbing headlines: according to studies, over one third of Americans are obese, and one third don’t get enough sleep.

    The closeness of these two figures may be more than coincidence. A growing body of research shows a strong association between sleep deprivation and weight gain. In a meta-analysis that encompassed 634,511 subjects, both male and female, ranging in age from 2 to 102, researchers found a consistent increased risk of obesity among those who don’t sleep enough.

    So what role does sleep loss play in weight gain—and, on the flip side, can quality sleep help with weight loss?

    Sleep and Weight Loss Diet Donuts

    Weary willpower  

    Before a bunch of unhealthy food can cause weight gain, you first have to make the decision to eat that unhealthy food. And there’s a great deal of evidence that sleep plays a major role in deciding whether or not you indulge.

    Sleep deprivation dulls activity in the brain’s frontal lobe, which is the region responsible for decision making and impulse control. So when a coworker offers you a donut, you take it, rather than eating the yogurt you so dutifully packed.  

    What’s more, being overly tired actually makes your brain more interested in junk than you’d normally be. This is because sleep deprivation lights up your brain’s reward center, leading you to seek “pleasurable, rewarding experiences”… such as the nefarious donut mentioned earlier.

    In one study from Berkeley, participants rated the desirability of certain foods both when they were well-rested and then again after sleep deprivation. In the state of sleep debt, the amygdala portion of the brain (which is involved in emotions, pleasure and appetite, and an important part of the brain’s reward system) was highly activated. Participants consistently rated unhealthy, high-calorie foods as more desirable than they had when they were well-rested.

    The research bears out in real life, too. Sleep-deprived Japanese factory workers are more likely to snack between meals, eat out, and not eat vegetables; Americans who don’t sleep enough consume more sugar and have less variety in their diet; in Germany, inadequate sleep is associated with increased fast food consumption.

    And to top it all off, sleep-deprived people also eat bigger portions. Bottom line: sleep helps you resist temptation and make smarter food choices.

    Sleep and Weight Loss Woman Eating Burger

    Fatigue and fullness

    So say you’re sleep-deprived and you splurge on two (okay, three) slices of pizza at lunch.  At least you’ll be full for a while and not eat anymore waistline-expanding goodies, right?

    Well, maybe not.

    Short sleep disrupts the balance of your hormones, including leptin and ghrelin. Leptin is often referred to as the “satiety hormone,” causing you to feel full and suppressing appetite, while ghrelin triggers hunger and plays a large role in initiating eating.

    When you’re not well-rested, your leptin levels plummet and your ghrelin levels rise; one study found that subjects who slept for 5 hours had 15.5% lower leptin than those who slept a full 8 hours, and 14.9% higher ghrelin. This means that you’ll not only be eating less healthy, more caloric food—you’ll also feel hungrier and seek food more frequently.

    Sleepless and stress-full

    Among the many benefits of proper sleep is that it can reduce stress, which, in turn, can help reduce your weight. How? It comes back to another hormone—this time, cortisol.

    Cortisol is a hormone that is released in response to stress, and its levels are closely tied to our natural sleep/wake cycles. So when those cycles get disrupted, so do those levels, causing a spike in cortisol in the bloodstream.

    This spike doesn’t just make you feel stressed out. Cortisol causes fat to be stored around the organs (especially visceral organs, which translates to belly fat), and also causes fat cells to become larger. Studies have shown that elevated cortisol can cause increased belly fat even in otherwise slender individuals.

    Sleep and Weight Loss Tired Guy Leaning Against Tree

    Metabolism malfunction

    You know how not sleeping well makes you feel groggy and lethargic? Well, turns out your metabolism feels pretty much the same way.

    When you’re well-rested, your metabolism is a well-oiled machine, efficiently processing the calories that you consume. On the flip side, when you’re in a state of sleep deprivation, your groggy metabolism can’t keep up with your food intake. What causes this breakdown? It all comes down to insulin.

    See, insulin plays an important role in helping our body convert sugar into energy for our cells. When our body can’t properly use insulin (insulin resistance) that sugar remains in our bloodstream and eventually is converted into fat. This is the case for those who have diabetes—and, research shows, for those who aren’t getting enough sleep.

    One study showed that after just four nights of short sleep, subjects’ ability to respond to insulin decreased by 16%—a difference comparable to that between the cells of obese vs. lean people—and the insulin sensitivity of their fat cells dropped by 30%. The latter is particularly important because fat cells play a crucial role in storing and releasing energy. Meanwhile, insulin resistance in the brain means that insulin can’t do its job of reducing hunger cues.

    One report put it in stark terms: “Chronic sleep loss can reduce the capacity of even young adults to perform basic metabolic functions, such as processing and storing carbohydrates or regulating hormone secretion.”

    As if your metabolism wasn’t getting a big enough blow from the insulin resistance, there’s this: sleep deprivation reduces the production of thyroid-stimulating-hormone, which is an essential player in proper metabolism. Ouch.

    Too sleepy to sweat

    Anyone who has tried to slim down or get into better shape knows the importance of regular exercise, as well as how tough it can be to get into a workout routine. To the surprise of exactly nobody, not getting enough sleep makes it much more difficult to achieve this.

    It’s intuitive—when you’re tired, you don’t want to go exert a bunch of energy. And studies show that subjects with sleep problems report a significant reduction in their levels of physical activity. What’s more, the increased ghrelin and decreased leptin levels associated with sleep loss mean an overall reduction in energy expenditure.

    And if you do drag your tired butt to the gym, you’ll be fighting an uphill battle to keep yourself there for a full workout. Sleep deprivation increases your perceived exertion and increases the likelihood that you’ll cut your sweat session short.

    Sweet dreams for good genes

    Your lifestyle is a huge factor in determining your weight, but the fact is that genetics also play a role. This can be super discouraging to those who are working hard to eat right and work out but still can’t lose the weight because of a genetic predisposition to a higher BMI.

    However, research shows that adequate sleep can reduce the influence your genetics have on your weight. In a study of identical twins that looked at BMI, genetics, and lifestyle factors including diet, exercise, and sleep habits, they found that the BMI variations in those who slept adequately were less dependent on genetics. However, those who slept less saw 70% of their BMI variations come from hereditary factors.

    Sleep and Weight Loss Well-Rested Guy

    The final word

    From the food you choose to eat, to how your body processes that food, to your workouts, to the relative impact of all of these components, sleep influences every aspect of your weight. Diet and exercise may get more press, but science has made it increasingly clear that sleep is the essential third pillar of fitness.

    So if losing weight, getting fit, or just maintaining a healthy BMI is one of your resolutions, getting enough shut-eye needs to be as well.


    Interested in the latest ways a good bed can help you sleep? Read more here.

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  3. Fit for a king? New and classic mattress sizes explained.

    Fit for a king? New and classic mattress sizes explained.

    With increasing interest in health and better sleep, among both millennials and baby boomers, more people are upgrading their mattresses. Usually that means a king size. In keeping with this trend, the mattress industry has moved to provide more options. Here’s an overview of what’s currently out there, starting with King and working on down to Twin.

    KING SIZE, a plethora of choices

    King size is the most popular choice for master bedrooms. This category has the most options, from sizes to special configurations or shapes. You’ll find king mattresses that are a little longer, ones that are built to allow separate movement on a power base and ones that are somewhere in the middles.

    STANDARD KING, 76”W x 80”L

    Pros:  A king mattress provides an extra 16” of width (or 8” per person) more than a queen, for a more comfortable and less-crowded sleeping experience, particularly if you put the extra width between you. It is essentially the same size as two twin mattresses. Also great option if you have pets or children who like to climb in bed with you. Cons: Heavier and requires more room than queen size beds.

    King Mattress Dimensions

    CALIFORNIA KING, 72”W X 84”L

    Pros:  At 84” long, California King mattresses are perfect for taller persons or anybody who wants more length in their mattress. It gives each sleeper 6” more sleeping width than a queen size bed. California King mattress size is nice for use with an adjustable base, because it provides extra length even with the head and foot elevated. If you’re taller or have a pet who likes to sleep at the foot of the bed, California King is a good choice. Cons: Takes up more space than a queen size, less width than a Standard King.

    California King Mattress Dimensions

    SPLIT TOP KING, 76”W X 80”L

    Also referred to as a Split Head King and a DreamTop™ King, this is a newer entry into the market. Pros:  It is built for use with a power adjustable base, with a split in the head section of the mattress about a third of the way down. This allows separate movement of head portion of the bed, which is the section that has the largest range of movement. The idea is to give an option to couples who like to cuddle while sleeping without the seam of a Split mattress. The foot of the bed, which rises less than the head, can still be operated separately, but is one piece. Cons: This bed requires special sheets, which can be harder to find, but are sold by some manufacturers who offer this mattress size, including Reverie.

    Split Top King Mattress Dimensions

    SPLIT TOP CALIFORNIA KING, 72”W X 84”L

    Also referred to as a DreamTop™ California Split King. Same as Split Top King above, except for the size, which is 4” longer and 4” less wide. Great for taller couples who like to cuddle while sleeping but who want the comfort options that a power base provides. Also good for couples whose pet sleeps at the foot of the bed.

    California King Split Top Mattress Dimensions

    SPLIT KING, 38”W X 80”L

    (Two mattresses used side by side, for a total size of 76”W x 80”L)

    An innovative newer option, Split King beds are made for use with power adjustable bases. Pros:  They are great for couples who have different preferences for firmness in a mattress. They’re good for couples with different sleep preferences or schedules, allowing each partner to sleep in a different position, or one partner to read elevated while the other sleeps flat. They’re also nice for people who have different body temperatures; for instance, the partner who sleeps hot can opt for natural latex and the partner who sleeps cold might like a memory foam option. With a split king, you each get your own fitted sheet and can either sleep with one big flat sheet, or get your own completely different twin sheet sets and blankets, if one of you is known to steal the covers. If the power base has a massage function, each partner can use that separately, too, without disturbing the other. Cons: People who like to cuddle while sleeping sometimes find the seam down the middle bothersome.

    split king mattress dimensions

    SPLIT CALIFORNIA KING, 36”W X 84”L

    (Two mattresses used side by side, for a total size of 72”W x 84”L)

     Pros: A Split California King mattress gives ample space and length to each sleeper. When paired with adjustable bases, Split California King beds offer more comfort choices for couples who have different preferences in mattress firmness, sleeping positions or who keep different sleep schedules (see Split King description above). If the power base has a massage function, each partner can use that separately, too, without disturbing the other. Cons: People who like to cuddle while sleeping sometimes find the seam down the middle bothersome.

    split california king mattress dimensions

    QUEEN, 60”W X 80”L

    Pros:  Queen mattresses are nice for couples with moderately sized bedrooms, bigger guest rooms, or couples who just like to sleep close together. Allows significantly more space than a full size mattress, with an extra 6” of width and 6” of length. This is also a good option for taller single sleepers who like to more space while sleeping. Cons: For couples with a bigger sleep footprint, queen size mattresses can feel cramped. A King mattress would give them an extra 12-18” of space.

    queen mattress dimensions

    SPLIT TOP QUEEN, 60”W X 80”L

    Also referred to as a Split Head Queen and a DreamTop™ Queen, this mattress is built for couples with moderately sized bedrooms who want to maximize the comfort of their adjustable power base. Pros: Each partner can enjoy separate movement on his or her sides of the bed, sleeping or watching tv in different positions or perhaps using the bed massage function (or not). The top section of the mattress is split about a third of the way down, allowing separate movement of the head portion of the bed (which is the section that with the largest range of movement). The foot of the bed, which rises less than the head, can still be operated separately, but is one piece. Couples can sleep and cuddle in the middle comfortably. Cons: This bed requires special sheets, which can be harder to find, but are sold by some manufacturers who offer this mattress size, including Reverie.

    split top queen mattress dimensions

    SPLIT QUEEN, 30”W X 80”L

    (Two mattresses used side by side, for a total size of 60”W x 80”L)

    An option that is still available but starting to fall out of fashion. Split Queen beds are made for use with power adjustable bases. Pros:  They allow individual movement of the bed for both partners, accommodating couples who have different preferences in a mattress in terms of firmness, sleeping position, body temperature or schedules. Cons: Splitting a smaller mattress all the way down the middle means having your separate territory can feel cramped at a width of only 30”. People who like to cuddle while sleeping sometimes find the seam down the middle bothersome. Sheets can be hard to find.

    split queen mattress dimensions

    FULL, 54”W X 74”L

    Full mattresses are great for tiny studio apartments, small guest rooms, single sleepers or children who need more space. Provide extra 16” of width over a twin and allows one sleeper to spread out comfortably as long as they aren’t too tall. Also, if you have a vintage bed, most of them are full size; people used to be smaller decades ago. Cons: At only 27” per person, full mattresses are a tight fit for two and they can be too short for some. There are no split power bases available for this size.

    full mattress size dimensions

    STANDARD TWIN, 38”W X 74”L

    The smallest size mattress out there that can still fit an adult. Pros: Twin mattresses are the longtime standard size for kids, teenagers, bunk beds, trundle beds and daybeds. They are economical and fit most standard bed frames. Cons: It’s not a ton of room and most people outgrow them by the time they are adults. Obviously this mattress is only meant for one person.

    twin mattress size dimensions

    TWIN XL, 38”W X 80”L

    Twin Extra Long mattresses are great for teens’ bedrooms, college dorm rooms and small apartments. They don’t take much space, yet are suitable for young adults and guests that are too tall for regular twin beds. Cons: Even though they add 6” of length over a Standard Twin, they are the same width as a regular twin size mattress and still feel cramped for many adults. 

    twin XL mattress dimensions size

    Which is right for you?

    Every person and every couple is different, so this advice is not absolute. Due to space considerations, we didn’t complicate things by talking about how, with Reverie, you can also get different firmness on each side of the mattress, even if they’re not split. Should you like to learn more about that, give us a call at 888-888-5990. We hope this detailed information has been helpful. Sleep well!



     


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  4. Certifiably proud: Awards and industry certifications we hold.

    Certifiably proud: Awards and industry certifications we hold.

    Every company in the industry talks about how great their beds are. But, as in most of life, independent verification is a good thing. Particularly when it comes to your bed. If you’re taking care of your health, you spend about a third of your life in your bed. What materials went into it? Are they safe? Have they been rigorously tested by reputable outside sources?

    At Reverie, that answer is yes. An obsessive yes, in fact. We are truly dedicated to bringing you a happy, healthy bed. So we aggressively pursue certifications and reviews that are meaningful. Here’s a thorough guide to what outside sources say about our mattresses, power beds and linens.

    Consumer Reports magazine

    See what Consumer Reports had to say about our DreamCell® mattress here.

    Women’s Choice Award® - Eight Times

    The Women’s Choice Award is based on surveying women about products they own and would recommend. Since women are the primary shoppers for home items, this carries special significance when it comes to bedroom furniture. Over 96% of women surveyed would recommend their Reverie power bed to a friend. And over 98% of women who own our full sleep system (i.e., both the mattress and the power base), would recommend them to a friend. We’ve won the award for our power bed (aka power bases) every year since 2012 and the award for our sleep systems since 2016.

    Women's Choice Awards for Sleep Systems and Adjustable Bases

    OEKO-TEX® Standard 100

    Truth is, in the real world, many products can’t be manufactured fully organically and still be functional or reasonably affordable. Which makes OEKO-TEX Standard 100 especially relevant … in real-world terms, it’s basically the next best thing to organic. OEKO-TEX Standard 100 is rigorous about safe levels of substances like chemical flame retardants, pesticides, formaldehyde, colorants and allergic dyes. It also restricts chemicals like formaldehyde and VOC emission levels. OEKO-TEX Standard 100 means a product was tested for over 700 harmful substances through independent labs. In many cases, their standard is more stringent than legally required. They also regulate substances that scientific data show may be harmful but aren’t yet legally banned.

    In another show of toughness, OEKO-TEX Standard 100 certification is not awarded unless all components of the product meet their standards. In the case of a mattress, that means the foam, the outer cover, the threads used in quilting, the zippers–i.e., when they say everything, they mean everything. And the closer to the skin or the younger the intended user, the more stringent the standards. OEKO-TEX also insists on criteria regarding environmentally-conscious production.

    Reverie is proud to have OEKO-TEX Standard 100 certification for all the natural latex components of our Dream Supreme™ mattress lines, including the foam springs and comfort layers.  

    Reverie DreamCell all natural latex foam springs

    CertiPUR-US®

    This certification comes from a nonprofit group that monitors the foam used in mattresses, whether it’s latex, memory foam or some other polyurethane. A versatile and far-reaching certification, CertiPUR-US monitors foam for toxic and carcinogenic materials within the foam itself like lead, formaldehyde, mercury, unsafe flame retardants, etc. CertiPUR-US certification also means that VOC levels (sometimes referred to as off-gassing) are low and within safe ranges. Lastly, CertiPUR-US certifies foam for manufacturing practices that look out for everybody’s future; namely, they strictly prohibit any chemicals that contribute to ozone depletion.

    Reverie has CertiPUR-US certification for the memory foam used in our Hybrid mattresses as well as our RevTek™ polyurethane foam.


    Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)

    GOTS is for fabrics, and it’s the strictest level of certification—meaning no toxic stuff can pass through here. It’s recognized around the world as the leading processing standard for organic textiles, defining criteria that cover environmental, health, and social concerns. A GOTS certification gives the consumer a worldwide guarantee of quality.

    There are two classes of GOTS certification: “organic” and “made with X% organic.” The only difference between these two classes has to do with the proportion of organic fibers in the material. A product carrying the “organic” label has more than 95% certified organic fibers, while “made with X% organic” has at least 70% organic fibers.

    There are also restrictions concerning what the other 5% or 30% can contain. Certain additions—like formaldehyde, heavy metals, chlorine bleach and polyurethane—are strictly prohibited. For additional safety and authenticity, all organic fibers must be kept separate from conventional fibers during production. And there are corporate responsibility requirements as well: manufacturers must adhere to a number of standards regarding environmental stewardship and fair labor practices.

    Reverie uses certified organic GOTS materials for our organic linens as well as our organic pillow covers.

    Intertek® Quality Performance Mark (QPM)

    This is a little-known - but brutal - durability test for mattresses. It basically involves abusing them repeatedly with a giant, heavy roller. We are proud to carry the Intertek certification on all our mattresses, so you can be certain they will provide you with proper support for ten years, and likely well beyond. In addition, we also have the Intertek QPM designation for having met their rigorous flammability standards.

    Reverie 9T power bed aka adjustable base

    UL-962

    UL-962 is the U.S. standard for home furnishings, certifying that safety standards for electrical, flammability and injury risk have been met. Again, they don’t take anybody’s word for it. Furniture is tested by a nationally recognized and accredited independent lab, ETL.

    All Reverie power beds (aka, adjustable power bases) have been certified to standard UL-962.

    Electronics certifications

    Reverie power beds are:

    • FCC-certified to meet safety standards for electromagnetic interference.

    • SIG-certified for any Bluetooth® modules we use. SIG is an independent organization that certifies that products meet all Bluetooth requirements.

    • UL-listed for linear actuators. Underwriters Laboratory is a premier certification organization for electronics.

    Power bed durability testing

    Even though it isn’t required for power beds to be sold, our standards are high. We have the most strenuous electromechanical load durability testing in the industry. Our standard weight limit across all Reverie  power beds is 850 pounds, which includes the weight of the mattress and anybody/anything on top of it. That’s up to 200 lbs. more than most of our competitors.

    A final word on certifications

    We are all citizens of the same planet, and Reverie is committed to protecting it. We firmly believe that healthy materials, quality parts and safety in design are integral to a restorative sleep experience. Durability is incredibly important as well, and we stand by all of our products with strong warranties. You can rest easy on a Reverie bed.

    The Bluetooth® word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIF, Inc. Any use of such marks by Ascion LLC is under license.

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  5. Reverie In The News 2018

    Reverie In The News 2018

    Here's what people are saying about Reverie out in the big wide world in 2018, with our most recent press coverage first. Click the link to read the story.

    JANUARY 2018

    Reverie CEO in Active Times

    Martin Rawls-Meehan discusses high tech sleep with this fitness-focused blog.

    Story here.

    Our CMO discusses sleep with Credit.com

    Reverie's Chief Marketing Office Lisa Tan talks New Years resolutions and weight loss.

    Story here.

    CES 2018

    We went to CES, the prestigious Consumer Electronics Show, for our first time ever. And we made quite an impression with our technology and our mind-control bed.

    Innovation and Tech Today

    Their assistant editor checks out our mind-control bed and interviews us on video at CES.

    A top tech magazine gives us their CES Editor's Choice Award.

    Innovation and Tech Today magazine gave us their Editor's Choice Award for 2018.

    Story here.  

    Check out our CES video. 


    Sleep tips with Tech Republic at CES.

    Video sleep tips from our CEO, Martin Rawls-Meehan.

    See video.

    Our CEO talks about our smart bed with Tech Republic.

    Learn how reading your brain waves will lead to better sleep in the future.

    See video.

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  6. The Split King Guide to a Better Relationship

    The Split King Guide to a Better Relationship

    He said, she said. Venus, Mars. The battle of the sexes isn’t limited to waking hours. When you don’t get your way in terms of sleep, it usually means less sleep. Which leads to to more crankiness. And then all bets are off, grrr.

    How do both of you happily coexist in the same bed? If you sleep differently, the answer could be a split king adjustable bed. A Split King has two twin-size mattresses that can be raised and lowered separately on top of one king-size adjustable base.

    Here’s our handy guide to some of the top bedtime relationship issues a Split King could help resolve.

    He snores, she doesn’t.

    44% of all men are habitual snorers. Thankfully, Split King adjustable power bases have one of the greatest features ever developed for womankind:  the Anti-Snore position. Raise the head of his side of the bed, and usually that locomotive roar will subside. Settle flat on the other side of bed and, ahhhh. Can you say #bliss? 

    She needs to check emails, he wants lights out.

    Even though we strongly advise against it, we know many of you work in bed, arrgh. If you must, at least allow the saner partner some peace. You can dash off some late-night emails with a fully raised head and support under your knees to hold that laptop or tablet. Meanwhile, your partner can adjust to whatever sleep position works best, perhaps lying flat on his side. He can avoid all that bad blue-screen light and enjoy all that sleep you should be getting, hint, hint. 

    He sleeps one way, she sleeps another.

    Side and back sleepers often enjoy a little elevation. Stomach sleepers, not so much – flat is best. In an adjustable bed, to each his or her own. No need to compromise. There are also different positions that help alleviate pain and allergies. If you have a sore back, you can sleep in Zero Gravity position, while he fights his allergies with a raised head. Or if you’re pregnant, you can sleep flat on your side, while he nurses that ankle sprain with elevated feet. 

    She sleeps like a nomad; he sleeps like a rock.

    If one of you moves a lot while sleeping, it doesn’t have to disturb the other’s sleep. The small divide in the Split King keeps your partner from rocking your world in ways that you do not appreciate. It’s like hanging a Do Not Disturb sign on your side of the bed.

    The infinite number of positions achievable in a split adjustable king can also help to alleviate many medical conditions like restless legs and keep both partners sleeping comfortably. 

    He gets up early, she sleeps in late.

    Many power foundations have programmable massage features or raise-to-wake alarms. If the adjustable base is well-designed, you can enjoy either feature (or both) without the vibrations or moving parts disturbing your partner. Some also have nightlights under the bed, allowing you to hit the bathroom or even make a late-night fridge run without disturbing your partner. How considerate! 

    She’s cold, he’s a furnace.

    Or vice versa. For many couples, it’s not a matter of fighting for the blankets, it’s fighting off the blankets as well. With a Split King, one of you can pile on extra twin blankets on your side of the bed, the other can forgo blankets altogether and sleep with a lightweight organic cotton sheet.

    One caveat: if you’re a maximal cuddler, a Split King has a very small gap between the two mattresses which some people find less comfortable. If that’s the case, you’ll have to weigh the pros and cons, i.e., cuddling versus crankiness. The gender gap can be further accommodated with a mattress that can be customized in firmness on both sides for each of you.

    All in all, a Split King has some big advantages that can promote harmony, increase the amount of restful sleep you both get and work well for most couples. We wish you luck bridging the divide and sleeping happily ever after. For our obsessive explanation of what a Split King base is, click here.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  7. Advanced Bedroom Feng Shui

    Advanced Bedroom Feng Shui

    Feng shui centers around the idea of Qi, which is a flowing life force that basically rules the earth. Qi (pronounced chee) swirls all around us, the vital energy of life. Everything and everyone on earth gives off Qi and is affected by it.

    The words feng and shui are Chinese and literally translate into wind and water. If you think about the wind in the mindset of the Chinese, it translates into human breath. So feng shui represents the most crucial elements of life: wind (the ability to breathe) and water, which composes up to 60% of the human body. No human can last long without either. Not coincidentally, both wind and water are primary distributors of Qi.

    The theory of feng shui is that you can control and enhance the flow of Qi with the design of spaces and placement of objects. You can see why that would be relevant to the bedroom. Since we’ve already done a post about basic bedroom feng shui, 8 Feng Shui Principles for a Better Bedroom, we figure you are already semi pros on the subject. You know never to sleep with your feet facing the door, to avoid sharp corners, pick a room at the back of the house and choose soothing colors. Now we’re moving on to some more advanced ideas to really bring on the zen.

    Big chandelier

    Skip the monoliths

    No hulking furniture next to the bed, blocking the Qi, making you feel small, obscuring your view or subconsciously feeling that it might tip over and crush you. Likewise, chandeliers and ceiling fans are great, but not over the bed. One surprising tip: huge bedrooms aren’t great for sleep. They can actually make you feel vulnerable, because it’s harder to keep track of what’s going on in a big room. There’s more stuff in the room, and you may not have a good line of sight to the door or the window. This may be a leftover instinct from caveman times.

    Bed placement

    Headboards create a feeling of safety and solidity, protecting your head and also shielding you from anything behind you that you can’t see. They’re a great choice if you must put your bed underneath a window or in the middle of the room. Make sure the headboard is solid and attached to the bed, so you’re not creating a feeling of unease, worrying that it might tip over. Avoid placing your bed near a window, where your body’s Qi may fly up and out the window.

    Woman standing at open bedroom window

    Air care

    While clean air is essential for Qi, carbon dioxide is not. Having plants in your bedroom is a contested point of Feng Shui—as plants often grow at night, emitting carbon dioxide. If you like plants, we recommend keeping them across the room rather than next to your bed and keeping them on the small side. In the morning, open the windows to let out carbon dioxide from your own breathing. A colossal bedroom feng shui mistake: dried flowers. They connote death. #Avoid

    Clothes hanging on chair

    Chaos containment

    Clutter not only stops the flow of Qi, it stresses you out. Get rid of it. All of it. Also stressful? Intense or disturbing artwork in the bedroom. The Delacroix battle reproduction or neon Peter Max poster is better for the living room. Likewise, bizarre or precarious furniture should be banished. Glass tables, grotto chairs and psychedelic pillows should be relocated elsewhere.

    Karma patrol

    The bedroom is no place to hold on to negative energy. Toss your ex’s old sweatshirt and that mix CD in the bottom drawer. Use a sage stick to burn away bad vibes and remember to wave it in the corners, where bad Qi can get trapped. For obvious reasons, if you have an en suite, keep the bathroom door closed. Keep your bedroom door closed, too. The idea is to keep Qi in the room at night, freely circulating.

    window treatments

    Give peace a chance

    Good sleep hygiene is something we often talk about on this blog and, unsurprisingly, it is also good bedroom feng shui. Eliminate noise. Bring nature in with organic sheets. And invest in quality window treatments. Look for ones that block out light and can be easily opened and closed. You want to shut out light when sleeping, but also be able to welcome it into your bedroom in the morning. Ease yourself gently awake with a smartphone alarm that uses chimes or other peaceful sounds. Or get a combo alarm clock/light that brightens slowly, waking you by simulating the rising sun.

    Nurturing relationships

    It’s like dating advice, but good feng shui involves inviting the kind of relationship you want into the bedroom. Symmetry around the bed is good. Go for two lamps, two candlesticks and bedside tables on both sides. Include artwork that depicts a couple rather than a single person. Peonies in the room promote love; avoid single flowers. And never put the mirror over, next to, or opposite the bed. Not only can the reflections be distracting, but feng shui says bad mirror placement is a triple threat. It can magnify problems, make the Qi bounce around the room uneasily and invite others into your relationship.

    All in all

    The more we learn about feng shui, the more it seems grounded in common sense, a light understanding of the workings of the subconscious mind, and even some principles of physics. You know the saying, “Good luck is good planning.” Well, good sleep is good planning, too. We encourage you to give your bedroom a makeover with some of our feng shui tips, and let us know how they work for you.

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  8. A Stanley Cup Champion Talks About His New Bed

    A Stanley Cup Champion Talks About His New Bed

    The NHL started its season. If you follow hockey, you know that it’s one of the most challenging and grueling sports to play. Night after night, it’s lots of checking, slamming into the boards, falling onto hard ice and a gonzo pace that never lets up for the entire game. To paraphrase the old Ginger Rogers line, hockey players do everything baseball players do, but with full contact and on skates.

    One can only imagine the effect on the body, even for young healthy guys. Combine it with a vigorous road schedule, and that kind of pounding would create a strong need for sleep. Over the summer, Reverie gave Steven Oleksy, a defenseman for the Pittsburgh Penguins, one of our Dream Supreme Sleep Systems. Oleksy, who runs a competitive hockey league over the summer, has been sleeping on it ever since.

    How has his journey to great sleep been going?

    Frankly, Oleksy’s journey has been short. Upon trying our bed in at our showroom outside of Detroit, he was impressed. “I’d never been on a sleep system before. I could feel immediately that it was a custom bed,” says Oleksy. And then, when his bed was delivered at home? “The very first night, I noticed a huge change in my sleeping patterns. I didn’t set an alarm clock and hopped right out of bed at 7:30am, ready to go. My legs felt great!” (Oleksy says it so enthusiastically, the exclamation point had to be added for honesty.)

    The very next day, he told a friend the bed “was life changing.” Within the first few days, he noticed other things, too. He began falling asleep fast and sleeping soundly instead of restlessly. “I didn’t even dream,” he says. He also doesn’t wake up groggy any more, rendering his snooze button irrelevant. Oleksy used to suffer from sore throats in the morning. He thought the elevation of the Zero Gravity position, which he sleeps in and loves, helped with better drainage. (Another possibility might be our all-natural latex hypoallergenic mattress; it repels dust mites and bacteria, which thrive in other kinds of mattresses.)

    A job where sleep is crucial

    Great sleep is important to any athlete, but especially to a hockey player. On game days, their schedule involves a busy morning with breakfast at the rink, reviewing video, a short skate and stretching. All this happens before noon. Then most players head back home or to the hotel to nap for 2-3 hours in preparation for the evening’s game. Then it’s back to the rink in the late afternoon to work out, stretch some more and talk strategy. The game follows, with dinner afterward along with a debrief. And then it’s back to the hotel, usually around midnight. A long day, with sleep sandwiched in the middle and also capping off the day. It’s that important to performance.

    One of the biggest sleep challenges a hockey player faces is after the game. “It’s a super physical and intense game,” Oleksy says. “It’s hard to wind down. And often, it’s even harder at home, when I have other people and responsibilities to take care of.”  He finds the massage feature and the soft light of the under-bed nightlight are little luxuries that help him fall asleep.

    Oleksy says “what sets you apart at every level of the game is how quickly you can recover.” And he thinks his Reverie bed really does help. “Those little aches and pains? They don’t bother me much or at all anymore.” Sleeping better maximizes his workouts, improves his mindset and minimizes the effects of constant travel.

    A measurable difference

    Every year, hockey players take assessment tests for power, endurance, etc. This year, Oleksy had his highest scores ever across the board, which he attributes in part to sleeping better. He is also very fastidious about taking care of himself. He eats healthfully and never drinks alcohol, with one exception … if it’s from the Stanley Cup. “It’s my job to stay in shape,” he says seriously. “I’ve noticed that when I don’t sleep properly or am up late, I tend to make bad decisions, especially eating worse.”

    Lately Oleksy has been loving our new Nightstand app. “It’s great,” he says. “It has so many capabilities.” He’s now programming his own sleep routines, with various massage settings and positions of the bed set to run automatically.

    He thinks anyone could benefit from the bed, primarily because everybody needs great sleep. “They’ll wake up, ready to go.” And he thinks it would be great for anybody who suffers from back or shoulder pain. Of course, we love that he’s also been talking up the bed to his teammates, telling them, “If there’s one investment to make, this bed is worth every penny.”

    About life as a Stanley Cup champion

    A genuine and humble guy, Oleksy says his philosophy of the game is that he wants “to be the hardest working guy out there.” He is grateful to have achieved every hockey player’s dream by having been on a team that won the Stanley Cup. And he’s trying hard to cherish every moment of being a champion. “Nobody can take that away from me.” Rather than be annoyed, he’s grateful to the fans who say “hi” and ask for autographs.

    Asked about the Penguins’ chances of repeating as Stanley Cup champions this year, he shows he’s learned a bit about the media and interviews, however. He modestly declines to make any prediction. “It’s always hard to tell,” he says, nonchalantly. “We should be competitive.”

    Got it. Continue to sleep well, Steven, and good luck. Your friends at Reverie will be rooting for you.

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  9. Van Gogh’s happy place: his bedroom

    Van Gogh’s happy place: his bedroom

    So much is known about the tortured life of Post Impressionist Vincent Van Gogh. Co-dependent and enmeshed with his art dealer brother. A well-documented descent into madness. Buddies with Gauguin for a while. And then there’s the ear incident. But what about his moments of repose? Were there any? As with most painters, the answer can be found in his work.

    Van Gogh’s search for peace

    Van Gogh lived a nomadic existence as an adult, bouncing from city to city, house to house, job to job. 37 residences in 37 years. However, as an adult, there was only one place the artist is known to have loved and considered to be home: his Yellow House in Arles. No surprise, then, that he felt compelled to paint his bedroom there, something he did three times.

    Van Gogh’s Bedrooms:  An exhibit at the Art Institute of Chicago

    All three paintings are now together in North America for the first time at the Art Institute of Chicago as part of a major exhibit focusing on the artist’s search for home.

    Until the birth of Impressionism around 1872, paintings were mostly formal. If artists wanted to be included in important exhibitions, they had to paint about religion, mythology, wars or wealthy people, otherwise they could expect rejection and harsh reviews. Paintings of ordinary people were considered low brow, and paintings of bedrooms were scandalous. In a daring move, Van Gogh combined both elements.

    The paintings have long fascinated art historians and the public alike. It’s a rare opportunity to compare and contrast versions of the same subject from the same angle by the same artist.

    How the Van Gogh bedroom paintings differ

    The first version of the painting was created in 1888, soon after Vincent moved into the Yellow House, which he envisioned as a place of collaboration for artists. A relatively happy time for Vincent, this version is ordered and restful. Colors are muted, details are minimal, and portraits of his artist friends hang on the wall.

    After the first painting was damaged in a flood, before attempting to restore it, Vincent painted the second copy in identical scale in 1889 as a backup. He used the first version as reference. This second painting has a bigger voice with bold brushstrokes, intensified colors and more details throughout. The portraits on the wall change, presumably because he was no longer on good terms with his artist friends.

    The third, smaller painting was completed a few weeks after the second painting and not long before he died. It was a gift to his family. The painting is a mish-mash between the first two, feeling less personal and more desolate. The portraits hang hollow-eyed; one now appears to be a self-portrait.

    One can see why the historians obsess about the paintings: not only are the differences between them compelling, but their creation coincides with Van Gogh’s most prolific artistic period as well as his deteriorating health.

    Van Gogh meets Airbnb

    On a happier note, the Art Institute of Chicago has gone all out to make the exhibit engaging. They spent months recreating two 3D copies of the bedroom in exacting detail, with one exception:  the bed is full-size.

    Why deviate and put in a full-size bed? To make it more comfortable. Because the Institute built one of the rooms in an apartment building near the museum and is renting it out for $10 a night on Airbnb. The listing, written from the viewpoint of Van Gogh as landlord, is very amusing. To give the public a better chance at booking the room, rental availabilities have been announced in batches through the museum’s Twitter feed. If you can’t rent the room, you can still visit the second 3D version of Vincent’s bedroom at the museum.

    The exhibit runs through May 10th and includes many other prominent Van Gogh works. If you’re in Chicago, be sure to stop in.

    Tired of tortured sleep? Our sleep systems can help you enjoy many starry nights.

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