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  • Pregnancy Do's and Don'ts with Dr. Amelia Bailey - Episode No. 1
    Pregnancy Do's and Don'ts with Dr. Amelia Bailey - Episode No. 1

    At Reverie, we believe in the power of science and medicine. We work with some distinguished professionals who advise us on matters of sleep and health. Meet Dr. Amelia Bailey, a Harvard-trained Ob/Gyn and infertility specialist, who just happens to be the mom of two toddlers herself. We asked Dr. Bailey to give us some detailed tips and info on pregnancy, and she created this exclusive nine-part series for us.

    Episode No. 1:  Listen to Your Body

    Dr. Bailey talks exercise, nausea, smoothies and eating strategies for the first two trimesters to help keep your baby healthy. Enjoy, and be sure to watch her other eight great videos.

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  • Up all night? Expert tips to help your newborn sleep.
    Up all night? Expert tips to help your newborn sleep.

    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    We teach our children how to do everything: eat, talk, play.  But do we remember to teach our children to sleep? That’s right ... sleep, while a natural part of our biorhythms, is still a behavior that needs to be cultivated.  Here are a few ways to ingrain this important skill starting from the time they're an infant.

    Start young.

    As soon as your baby is born, he desires a schedule.  Early on, that timetable is most closely attuned to feeding intervals; but sleep is a normal part of each full cycle of eating, interacting, and resting.  Granted, your little one may seem to fight you on this every step of the way. Remember that they are learning how to do every skill necessary for survival while becoming accustomed to multiple new stimuli.  Be flexible with the clock, but try to adhere to a predictable order in each cycle: feed, play, sleep, repeat. The amount of time taken to complete each cycle may fluctuate, but the pattern should be the same so your baby knows what she is expected to do next.  It is one of your first forms of communication with her.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Have a wind-down routine.

    Your body takes time to go from “full steam ahead” to “sleep” mode, and your baby’s body is no different.  Establish a set of steps that takes about fifteen minutes and signals to your newborn that sleepy time is nearing. There isn’t one right routine, so you may want to experiment a little at first. 

    What might a routine look like?

    At my house, I would give the baby a bottle at 6:30pm while we snuggle, then close the blackout curtains, turn on the sound machine, change her diaper, put on pajamas, and talk for a few minutes before setting her into her crib with her pacifier around 6:50pm.  She usually fell asleep by 7:00pm. Over this time, she had received non-verbal clues (physical, auditory, and visual) that it was her bedtime. Your child may need more cues or fewer, so tailor your evening routine to what works for your family. For example, your infant may fall asleep after a bath and massage with lotion whereas mine did not. You are the parent. You will learn your baby’s preferences quickly.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Be consistent.

    Once you establish a time and routine, stick to it.  Of course, illness and unforeseen circumstances will lead to occasional disruptions, but you are responsible for adhering to the schedule you set for newborn as frequently as possible. Type a document that you can easily update and print for other caregivers so they are prepared to follow the same rituals.  This will help your baby and the caregiver, both of whom want an easy night.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    When to see a doctor?

    Certainly, if your baby cries like he is in pain when you lay him flat or has bouts of projectile vomiting, you should call your pediatrician for a gastrointestinal evaluation. A small percentage of babies have sleep disorders, so if you implement a routine and your baby still is sleeping poorly after a couple months, you may want to have her evaluated for that.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Sleep isn’t just for your baby.

    You need it too. Lack of sleep affects every area of health: intellectual, emotions, and physical well-being. For example, the immune system is less capable of fighting off infection when we are tired, which is certainly important if you have older children in school.  Create a relaxing place to rest in order to fall asleep faster and have more restorative sleep. A bed and pillow that support your body in any sleeping position as well as comfortable pajamas and bedding are essential. Top that off with a white noise machine and lavender sheet spray, and you are setting yourself up for success!

    Sometimes following these tips is hard. You want to snuggle longer, your little one does not want to go to bed yet, requiring you to put in more effort that night. Or activities and plans keep you out later than anticipated. That is okay. No one is a perfect parent; we are all just trying to do our best for our loved ones. Give your baby the gift of sleep, and your hard work will pay dividends.  Good luck!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Dr. Amelia P. Bailey is a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility (REI) specialist in Memphis, Tennessee.  She is the Director of Minimally Invasive Surgery for her practice and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  She completed residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville, where she served as Chief Resident, followed by a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.  While in Boston, she was a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Medical School and conducted joint research projects between Boston Children’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    As an REI, Dr. Bailey treats patients who are having difficulty conceiving or who have complicated gynecologic conditions and follows women throughout early pregnancy.  Her expertise in sleep and women’s health, including pregnancy, stem from professional as well as personal interests.  As the mother of two young children, she knows how important it is to get a good night’s rest and has used the Reverie Sleep System throughout both of her pregnancy and postpartum periods with excellent results.



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  • Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be
    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    If you're pregnant or already a mom, you know that sleep is both the sweetest thing and the hardest thing to get at the same time. What if there was something that would help you get comfortable, something that would make your life a little easier every day and every night?

    You may have heard about power beds or adjustable bases before. Your grandma might have had one, and if so, you may be picturing an old clunky medical-looking device that sounds like a dying power drill when it moves. Well, it's like the power beds of old have aged backwards and got their braces off: today's models seamlessly blend into your Insta-worthy bedroom and are quiet when they move. They connect with your phone, some have massage, and they have life-enhancing, marriage-boosting positions like anti-snore. These aren't your grandma's power bases anymore. And let me tell you: they make every minute in bed more comfortable.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    SIX POWER PERKS FOR PREGNANCY AND BEYOND

    Find comfort with unlimited adjustability.

    Pregnancy is nine months long. That's 275 nights and 2,190 long hours if you're trying to get comfortable. A power bed gives you individual degrees of customizability: it's like having a couch that can be turned into a chair, a chaise, or a lounger at the touch of a button. We recommend zero gravity (which raises your feet and head to induce weightlessness) for side sleeping.

    Give relief to your swollen feet.

    Sure, during the day you might be cramming your new sausage feet into the last pair of shoes that still fits, but at the end of the day, you just want sweet relief. Forget the tipsy stack of throw pillows: with a power bed you can easily elevate your feet with a power base to reduce the swelling.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    Get the support you need after delivery.

    Your body is absolutely amazing—pregnancy is proof, but having a baby still does quite a number on a lot of areas down there. If you had a C-section, your body is recovering from both childbirth and a major surgery. In either instance, you can probably use all the help you can get. A power base gives remarkable support for your stomach and abs while getting in and out of bed for the umpteenth time.

    Feed your baby comfortably.

    Power beds turn your warm bed into a nursing chair in the middle of the night and make nursing or bottle feeding ten times easier. You can even get split or split-top mattress options so you can be feeding while your partner is still silently in anti-snore position next to you.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    Experience stress-relieving massage.

    If there were ever a stage of life to get extra stress relief from long days, the early stages of motherhood would be a perfect time. Many power beds come with massage options that have proven circulation-enhancing benefits.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    Have a bed that fits your lifestyle.

    You probably use your bed for more than just sleeping: it might be your living room for reading or watching your favorite show, it's a table for breakfast in bed, it's the best spot for snuggling with your partner and your growing family. Power beds make those sweet, normal, everyday moments a lot more comfortable.

    Being a mom is no easy feat, and power bases make it just a little bit easier. 

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com

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  • Dads Need Sleep Too
    Dads Need Sleep Too

    Any new dad will tell you that there’s nothing more magical and life-altering than the arrival of your new baby. Among the major adjustments new fathers face, the most taxing is a severe alteration to their sleep schedules.

    During the first 24 months of your child’s life, you will lose an average of six months of sleep. But it’s the first three to six months that will really be grueling with your newborn waking up every two to three hours demanding to be fed or have their diaper changed. Lucky for all you zombie dads, there are some easy ways for new fathers to cope with sleep deprivation.  

    Dad need sleep

    Give Yourself More Credit

    Most people assume that in a co-parenting couple, it’s the mom who loses more sleep during the earliest days of a newborn’s life. That assumption is especially understandable when you consider a woman’s role in breastfeeding and the fact that infants awaken at night every two to three hours. Alas, leave it to science to disprove our educated guess.  

    Studies have found that dads get less sleep than moms and experience more confirmed fatigue during the day. But before you text your wife this link announcing your plans to sleep in tomorrow, we should note that the same study showed that while new mothers received more sleep over the course of the day, that rest was disturbed more often. The takeaway is that you are both exhausted and it’s your duty as a new dad, partner and employee to find ways to cope.

    If you’re surprised to learn that you’re getting less sleep than your better half, consider this: it’s not just women who have strong neurological reactions to an infant’s cry. The sound of a baby crying (even one that’s not your own) triggers a heightened emotional response that’s almost impossible to ignore.

    It Takes a Toll

    Your newfound sleep deficit affects everything from your relationship to the U.S. economy. When you don’t get a good night’s sleep, you have a harder time reading emotions, making misunderstandings with your partner more frequent and harder to resolve.

    And remember our mention of the economy? Researchers in 2016 found that the U.S. economy loses $411 billion a year due to insufficient sleep. When you aren’t sleeping well, you’re an unproductive employee.

    Dads need sleep too

    You Can Make It Better

    The good news? You will get through this and eventually your baby will sleep through the night. Until that happens though, it’s important to find ways to cope. Here are some ways to improve your sleep:

    1. Take turns with the baby.

    Unless you’re bottle-feeding, you won’t be able to pitch in as well as you’d like when it comes to night feedings. Do your best to establish a routine that ensures you are both getting sleep. Maybe that means sending your better half to bed early while you stay up late until the first feeding, or rising early to let mom snooze.

    This is also a great time to start using that extra guest room if you have one. Whichever one of you is on deck can rest in the spare room to ensure your better half is getting uninterrupted sleep. You’ll soon discover what works for you both, but the important part is to communicate openly and be consistent.

    2. Get a white noise machine.

    Newborns make noise when they sleep, even when they’re not crying. Adding a white noise machine to your sleep routine helps ensure that you don’t awaken to every little squeak and sigh. Still sleeping with the baby in your room? You’re in luck—white noise machines benefit the quality of baby’s sleep as well.

    3. Take a cat nap.

    A 20-minute nap can work wonders in restoring your brain functions midday, making you a more productive employee. If your office has a nap room, use it. If they don’t, consider having a conversation with your boss about dedicating some space to a little shut-eye.

    Dads need sleep too4. Avoid the midday caffeine boost.

    Caffeine has a half-life of five to seven hours in humans. If you have a cup of coffee after 3 p.m., your body won’t fully be rid of the caffeine until 1 a.m. or later. Foregoing that extra cup of coffee in the afternoon may feel painful in the moment, but will pay off later when you’ve fallen asleep faster. If your brain’s really struggling to let go of its afternoon reward, try filling the void with a short afternoon walk or treat yourself to a square of chocolate.

    5. Put your phone down.

    Your phone’s blue light messes with your melatonin production, reducing your body’s urge to fall asleep. Additionally, being on your phone means you’re more likely to be checking your email, which gets you thinking about work and worrying over tomorrow’s responsibilities. The best thing you can do is put your phone down and save it for the next morning.

    Dads need sleep too

    Armed with a little extra knowledge, we hope that you start catching some extra sleep and reap the rewards in all aspects of your life. Keep up the good work, dads, and enjoy this special time with your little one. Before you know it, they’ll be 15 years old and sleeping until noon every weekend.


    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    Dads need sleep too




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  • New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people feel more alert
    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people feel more alert

    A recent Michigan State University study showed that Reverie’s 3D-Wave massage goes well beyond the obvious feel-good benefits during the massage. Namely, using it for 30 minutes at bedtime can help you wake up feeling happier and more alert. And those effects last well into the day.

    A quick recap on the massage itself

    Our 3D-Wave technology is truly revolutionary. Using the scientific principle of resonant frequency, we developed a more dynamic massage with a circular motion not found on other massage furniture. It’s also gentler and quieter. No crude shaking of the bed or bruising shiatsu. Just a travelling, zen motion that increases blood flow and circulation. And because we’re Reverie®, we designed it so you can adjust it to your own needs. Up to four wave patterns at your beck and call, plus 10 levels of intensity. We have a short video explaining more here.

    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people stay more alert

    The methodology, in human-speak

    So here’s how the study went down. Male and female college students were studied for approximately 24 hours. One group of participants slept with a 30-minute 3D-Wave massage at bedtime, and the other group did not. Both groups were given cognitive tests before going to bed to establish a baseline and also given standard physiological tests throughout the night to track their sleep quality.

    Upon waking, they were evaluated across several measures. They were asked about their quality of sleep, and given another cognitive test. They rated their initial alertness and mood. Once they left the clinic and went about their normal lives, they were then texted every two hours throughout the day and asked to keep rating their  alertness and mood.

    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people stay more alert

    What happened?

    The group that had the massage was compared to the group that didn’t. And the results were heartening. People who had used Reverie 3D Wave™ massage the night before woke up feeling happier. Better yet? The effects were not fleeting. Those who had 3D-Wave massage were more alert throughout the day and also in a better mood.

    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people stay more alert

    What does it mean for you?

    Sleep is a complex thing. It is different for all people, and at Reverie, we view it as a puzzle to be solved on many fronts. For a long time, we’ve felt massage helped, and now we have some objective proof. Massage is just one of many things we invest a lot of energy into to help you succeed at great sleep.

    There’s really no way to go wrong with our 3D-Wave massage. It feels amazing, and many of us who sleep on the bed ourselves feel strongly that it helps us fall asleep. This study also supports the idea that it will help you feel happier and less tired all day long. At Reverie, this truly makes us happy. Our tagline is “Sleep well tonight. Live better tomorrow.” We mean it, and hope that you experience life-changing sleep every night.

    For our data hounds:

    Here’s the science behind the study:

    - EEG, EOG, EKG, respiration and oxygen levels measured to determine sleep quality.

    - Stanford Sleepiness Scale to measure alertness.

    - UNRAVEL computerized place-keeping test to measure cognitive fitness.

    - PANAS test to measure mood.

    This study was funded in part by Reverie and by a grant from the SCIP/TCA program from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms

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  • New Parent? You Have Permission to Nap
    New Parent? You Have Permission to Nap

    Unless you plan on becoming a Navy SEAL, the sleep deprivation you experience as a new parent will likely be the most severe you ever encounter. Need proof? During the first 24 months of your child’s life, a survey revealed you’ll lose an average of six months’ sleep.

    One of the best things you can do for your overall wellbeing during this incredible period of your life is to take daily naps. For most of us, the last nap we had was some time during our senior year of college, but for new moms and dads, we encourage a short daily nap as often as possible.

    Sleep makes everything better

    The recommended amount of nightly sleep for adults is seven to nine hours. Whether you’re doing all the nightly feedings yourself or dividing them up with your better half, you’re not going to meet that nightly quota during the first few months of your child’s life. That means you’re going to be exhibiting signs of sleep deprivation.

    A person deprived of sleep experiences more than just a tired body. In one study published by the Journal of Neurobiology and Circadian Rhythms, researchers found that sleep-deprived individuals had trouble identifying facial expressions of happiness and sadness.

    It’s not only your capacity to recognize other people’s emotions that suffers. When you’re not getting enough sleep, your ability to express joy in your face and voice is also impaired.

    Enter the benefits of a nap.

    Napping does a body good

    A short cat nap (we’re talking no more than 20 minutes) improves your mood and cognitive abilities. Naps do everything from restoring alertness to reducing accidents and creating feelings of rejuvenation.  

    New Parent You Have Permission to Nap

    Get the timing right

    Most experts recommend taking either a short 20-minute nap or completing a normal adult sleep cycle, which lasts 90 minutes. Anywhere in between or over that timeframe, and the napper will awake in a groggy state, which for our purposes is not what we’re after. Unless you’re certain your baby will snooze for an hour and a half, you may want to play it safe and set your alarm for 20 minutes.

    If you’re a stay-at-home parent, then the best advice is to nap when the baby naps. Both stay-at-home and working parents should try to avoid napping past 3 p.m. as it may affect your ability to fall asleep later that night.

    Ditch the stigma

    Napping is viewed as somewhat taboo in American culture, often creating perceptions of laziness. If you’re a stay-at-home parent, then you may feel guilty or judged for napping instead of doing the housework, and if you’re a working parent, then you might worry that your boss and coworkers will think you’re slacking off.

    The truth is you’re going to be a more productive and relatable person if you nap during the first couple years of your child’s life. You are 100% allowed to let the dishes and laundry pile up during this time in your life, but you must take care of yourself in order to take care of your baby.

    New Parent You Have Permission to Nap

    Ask for help

    We know, we know. As a new parent, you want to feel like you have it all together (or just mostly together). But here's a little secret: nobody does! It's totally OK to ask for help. Call a friend or family member to come over and hold your adorable baby while you take a nap. They'll likely be thrilled you asked, and it gives you some much-needed rest. Think of it this way: if your friend called you with this request, you'd be happy to help. Know they would do the same for you.

    Happy napping, everyone!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms


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  • The New Parent’s Guide for a Better Night’s Sleep
    The New Parent’s Guide for a Better Night’s Sleep

    Between the constant feedings, dirty diapers, and that growing pile of laundry that’s threatening to establish itself as your home’s overlord, you just aren’t getting enough of that sweet (oh-so-sweet) sleep you want.

    By now you’re probably rolling your tired eyes and grumbling, “Tell me something I don’t know,” but hang in there, moms and dads. We have five simple strategies new parents can use to improve their sleep.

    What it really means to sleep like a baby

    Babies actually have a sleep cycle that’s in overdrive. At three months, babies need a hefty 15-16 hours of sleep. Babies will sleep (an often sporadic) 10 hours at night and 5 hours during the day napping. Plus, the average newborn spends 50 to 80 percent of their sleep time in REM and takes only 50 minutes to complete a full sleep cycle. In comparison, adults spend 20 percent of their sleep time in REM and complete a full sleep cycle in 90 minutes. Translation: your baby’s brain races through sleep like a NASCAR driver, while yours is cruising the parking lot in first gear.

    A newborn’s speedy sleep pattern is also affected by their small tummies, which cause them to digest breast milk and formula at a rapid pace. That’s the reason they wake up every two or three hours feeling hungry. During the first few months when you’re keeping their schedule, you experience sleep fragmentation. These constant breaks in your sleep cycle cause you to spend less time in deep sleep and more time in light sleep. Likely coming as no surprise—this is a recipe for exhaustion.

    How to maximize the sleep you’re getting

    Things will eventually improve. Your baby will start sleeping through the night and the new parent anxieties that keep you up will lessen. Until that time comes, you’ll want to take some steps to ensure you maintain some semblance of rest.

    1. Nap when the baby naps

    It may sound trite, but one of the healthiest things you can do as a new parent is accept that you can’t do it all. Let your dishes and laundry pile up, and go take a nap. Even if you can’t complete a full sleep cycle, the extra rest will do good for your body and mind.

    2. Give your bedroom an easy makeover

    While changing your wall color and buying new bedding would be nice, this isn’t that kind of makeover. Instead, consider making some alterations to your bedroom’s light, noise and temperature levels.

    You can make daytime naps easier by installing some blackout shades or wearing a sleep mask. We also recommend getting a white noise machine to drown out the buzz from the outside world.

    As for the temperature, it’s better to be on the cooler end of the spectrum. Our bodies’ core temperatures drop to initiate sleep. When we’re too warm, this process is slowed or stopped altogether. Ensure that you’ll drift off faster by keeping your bedroom’s temperature between 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit.

    3. Let’s talk about that baby monitor

    Baby monitors are great, don’t get us wrong. But when your baby hits that four month mark, they’re starting to sleep in more regular sleep cycles. Consider separating from the baby monitor at this point, if even for just a night to start. While a monitor can be a helpful tool in feeling connected and safe, it can be an unnecessary sleep stealer once your child has established more consistent sleep. In regard to SIDs-related safety, check out a sensor pad or a device like Owlet instead for added peace of mind.

    4. Go for a stroll

    Try putting your baby in the stroller and heading out for a brisk walk (weather permitting, of course). Fresh air has a way of lifting spirits, and the sunlight will help regulate both you and your baby’s circadian clocks. Plus, adding movement to your day is great for your sleep and will help make you feel more alert during the day.

    5. Be aware of your caffeine consumption

    Because caffeine has a half-life of five to seven hours, it takes your body anywhere between 10-14 hours to fully be rid of it. A cup or two of coffee in the morning will likely not affect your sleep at night (and let’s be honest: sometimes it’s the only way to make it through the aforementioned sleep deprivation), but think about giving yourself a cutoff mid-afternoon.

    While a good night’s sleep may seem like a distant memory, remind yourself that this won’t last forever. In the meantime, take care of yourself and rest when you can. Sleep does wonders in making you the parent, spouse, and friend you want to be.


    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms

    Read more »
  • How to Make Sleep a Family Priority
    How to Make Sleep a Family Priority

    Families share everything. From their genes down to their sense of humor, children take their cues from their parents. But there’s one personal trait that we may not realize is affecting our families. You guessed it—our sleep habits.

    In order for your household to function at its best, sleep has to become a family priority. Let’s talk about the importance of sleep for your family and discuss how you can improve it for everyone.

    How much sleep should everyone be getting?

    For adults, the recommended amount of nightly sleep is seven to nine hours. For children, it depends on their stage of development. Here’s a breakdown of the number of hours of sleep required per day, including naps:

    • Infants 4 months to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours
    • Children 1 to 2 years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours
    • Children 3 to 5 years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age should sleep 9 to 12 hours
    • Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep 8 to 10 hours
    • What happens when your family misses its sleep quota? 

    You know that not getting enough sleep will make you irritable, but one study suggests that sleep-deprivation causes adults to dole out harsher punishments.

    How to Make Sleep a Family Priority

    As for your kids? On top of the damage it does to their cognitive abilities and physical health, sleep-deprived children are cranky, more likely to behave badly, and often exhibit signs of hyperactivity and lack of focus (sleep deprivation is sometimes confused with ADHD in kids). Combine that with a tired parent’s short fuse and you have a recipe for more family feuds. By making a good night’s sleep a family initiative, you may be able to improve the emotional environment of your home.

    FOUR TIPS FOR A HEALTHY SLEEP ROUTINE

    1. Put the electronics to bed.

    The cues start with you. A survey by the National Sleep Foundation found that if a child’s parents slept with one or more electronic device on (e.g., smartphone, tablet) the child is more likely to do the same. The same survey found that both parents and kids sleeping with their devices exhibit poorer sleep quality than those who keep their devices off or out of the room.

    Pro tip: Set up a communal charging area in your home where you and your kids can plug in devices for the night. You’ll know they’re sleeping without their devices and getting better rest because of it.

    2. Eat dinner earlier.

    Young children take more time to digest their food. They need to eat at least two hours before bedtime to sleep well.

    3. Enforce your bedtime rules.

    Setting rules and sticking to them will make a big difference for everyone. Set a caffeine cutoff for 2 p.m., and set definite cut-off times for television, computers, and video games.

    4. Develop a consistent routine.

    Getting everyone to sleep at the appropriate time every night is a good start, but following a consistent bedtime routine signals to our brains that we’re going to sleep soon, allowing them to shut down even faster.

    How to Make Sleep a Family Priority

    Lay out clothes for the next day, brush teeth, and end the night with a wind-down activity such as reading together—which we recommend as both a great activity that’s been tied to academic performance and also as a relaxing activity to prepare the body for bed.

    As with everything else in your life as a parent, setting a good example of healthy sleep habits starts with you. It might be a challenge to reverse some bad habits (we recommend trying one new thing at a time) but the payoff is worth it. After all, healthier and happier families is something we can all get behind.


    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms

    Read more »
  • 3 Parenting Tips for Creating Sleep Balance with Your Partner
    3 Parenting Tips for Creating Sleep Balance with Your Partner

    Tell someone that you and your better half are expecting, and the first thing out of their mouth will be, “Congratulations!” The next will probably be, “Sleep while you can.”

    With newborns waking every two to three hours during their first three months, parents are coming up short on the seven to nine hours of nightly sleep recommended by the National Sleep Foundation. Sleep interruptions are the most severe with newborns, but can carry on in the following years as little ones navigate potty training, nightmares and the urge to climb in bed with their parents.

    For co-parenting couples, striking the right sleep balance with one another can be difficult, but it will be one of the most important things you can do for the sake of your child, your relationship, and your overall health. With that in mind, here are three tips to help parents strike a healthy sleep balance.

    3 parenting tips for creating sleep balance

    1. Divvy up the newborn night shift

    Many couples choose to put the responsibility of night feedings on one person’s shoulders, particularly if that individual is a stay-at-home parent or breastfeeding mom. But with most babies not sleeping through the night until the six-month marker or beyond, this can be extremely taxing.

    Studies have shown that sleep deprivation affects our abilities to interpret how our actions affect others and the other way around. So, unless we want to see our spouses become insensitive, socially-inept zombies, it’s probably best to split up the night.

    Approach night feedings with shifts. If one of you is naturally a night owl, let that person stay up later to tackle the first feeding while the other snoozes. Then swap so the night owl can sleep until morning. Another alternative is to switch on and off nightly, with one person getting a full night’s rest, while the other answers the baby.

    For breastfeeding mothers, these ideas may mean pumping ahead of time and getting your baby used to taking a bottle. No matter which method you choose, remember to be flexible with your routine, and acknowledge that from time to time, one of you may need to lean on the other for a little extra sleep.

    3 parenting tips for creating sleep balance

    2. Talk it out

    If your current sleeping setup isn’t working, make time to talk about it with your partner. Have the discussion when you’re both rested (more on that to come) and when you’re free from distractions (yes, your children count as distractions.) This will give you both a leg up in your abilities to listen and express yourselves.

    Resist the urge to frame the conversation around who does more on less sleep. Instead, explain the ways in which you’re struggling and ask for help. Odds are your partner has also been holding in strong feelings on this topic, so be ready to hear them out.

    Since parenting takes teamwork, try thinking of this conversation as reworking the playbook you and your teammate have been running. It’s not getting us the results we thought it would. How do we adjust so we can both feel like we’re winning?

    Lastly, be ready to have a conversation about sleep balance a few times over the course of your child’s life. Your kiddo’s sleep schedule will continue evolving as they grow. Keep the lines of communication open with your partner and you’ll both sleep happier.

    3 parenting tips for creating sleep balance

    3. Sleep more. Bicker less.

    Yet another motivation for striking a sleep balance, studies have shown that lack of sleep leads to more frequent and severe conflicts among couples. When you and/or your better half aren’t getting enough sleep, you’re more likely to bicker and have a harder time resolving the issues.

    If something’s bothering you, sleep on it and say your piece after getting some shut-eye.

    Bonus tip: Take turns sleeping in or napping on weekends.

    It may sound like a no-brainer, but Saturday and Sunday are the only days of the week where one of you can catch up on sleep while the other watches the kids. Try alternating weekends, or have one of you take Saturdays, while the other gets every Sunday.

    There’s no one-size-fits-all for sleep-deprived parents, but we hope these tips have given you some new ideas to try or inspired you to have a conversation about sleep balance with your partner. Just remember: you both deserve empathy, and you both deserve a good night’s sleep!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?


    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms



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  • How Sleep Aids in Weight Loss
    How Sleep Aids in Weight Loss

    Did you know that getting quality, restful sleep can help you lose weight?

    According to Sanjay Patel, M.D. a researcher at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, at least two dozen studies have confirmed that people who sleep less tend to weigh more. Studying almost 70,000 women over the course of 16 years, Patel and his colleagues discovered that women who sleep less than five hours a night were far more likely to gain weight than those who get at least seven and a half hours. And the difference wasn't negligible. In fact, they were 30% more likely to gain 30 or more pounds. Yikes.

    The sleep connection to appetite and metabolism.

    There are several different ways losing sleep can thwart your weight loss efforts. Research from the University of Chicago suggests that sleep deprivation may lead to a change in how our bodies regulate appetite, leading us to crave more food. “You may start not only eating more, but eating unhealthy foods — those high in fat and carbohydrates,” says Patel. “Another possibility is that because people who are sleep-deprived feel more fatigued, they exercise less. Sleep deprivation can also change your basal metabolic rate, slowing down how many calories you burn just doing basic life-sustaining activities, like breathing and maintaining body temperature.”

    The nitty gritty science of it.

    Michael Breus, Ph.D., clinical director of the sleep division at Southwest Spine & Sport in Scottsdale, Arizona, and author of Beauty Sleep, reports that sleep deprivation leads to an overproduction of ghrelin and a decrease in leptin production. Ghrelin is hormone that causes hunger; leptin is a hormone that prompts people to stop eating. This imbalance can lead to over-eating. Furthermore, the brain secretes growth hormones during sleep, which helps metabolize fat in the body.

    In short, the intertwined nature of sleep and weight loss continues to be uncovered, and in all cases it seems that better sleep contributes to a more ideal weight. If you're struggling to lose a few pounds, it might be time to refocus on your nightly slumber rather than the next juice cleanse.

    For more info about how different sleeping positions can help you sleep better, click here.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms


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  • Sleep and Weight Loss: Why Shut-Eye Is Essential for A Leaner You
    Sleep and Weight Loss: Why Shut-Eye Is Essential for A Leaner You

    There are a couple oft-cited “epidemics” in America, one being obesity, and the other inadequate sleep. Unfortunately, it’s not just attention-grabbing headlines: according to studies, over one third of Americans are obese, and one third don’t get enough sleep.

    The closeness of these two figures may be more than coincidence. A growing body of research shows a strong association between sleep deprivation and weight gain. In a meta-analysis that encompassed 634,511 subjects, both male and female, ranging in age from 2 to 102, researchers found a consistent increased risk of obesity among those who don’t sleep enough.

    So what role does sleep loss play in weight gain—and, on the flip side, can quality sleep help with weight loss?

    Sleep and Weight Loss

    Weary willpower  

    Before a bunch of unhealthy food can cause weight gain, you first have to make the decision to eat that unhealthy food. And there’s a great deal of evidence that sleep plays a major role in deciding whether or not you indulge.

    Sleep deprivation dulls activity in the brain’s frontal lobe, which is the region responsible for decision making and impulse control. So when a coworker offers you a donut, you take it, rather than eating the yogurt you so dutifully packed.  

    What’s more, being overly tired actually makes your brain more interested in junk than you’d normally be. This is because sleep deprivation lights up your brain’s reward center, leading you to seek “pleasurable, rewarding experiences”… such as the nefarious donut mentioned earlier.

    In one study from Berkeley, participants rated the desirability of certain foods both when they were well-rested and then again after sleep deprivation. In the state of sleep debt, the amygdala portion of the brain (which is involved in emotions, pleasure and appetite, and an important part of the brain’s reward system) was highly activated. Participants consistently rated unhealthy, high-calorie foods as more desirable than they had when they were well-rested.

    The research bears out in real life, too. Sleep-deprived Japanese factory workers are more likely to snack between meals, eat out, and not eat vegetables; Americans who don’t sleep enough consume more sugar and have less variety in their diet; in Germany, inadequate sleep is associated with increased fast food consumption.

    And to top it all off, sleep-deprived people also eat bigger portions. Bottom line: sleep helps you resist temptation and make smarter food choices.

    Sleep and Weight Loss

    Fatigue and fullness

    So say you’re sleep-deprived and you splurge on two (okay, three) slices of pizza at lunch.  At least you’ll be full for a while and not eat anymore waistline-expanding goodies, right?

    Well, maybe not.

    Short sleep disrupts the balance of your hormones, including leptin and ghrelin. Leptin is often referred to as the “satiety hormone,” causing you to feel full and suppressing appetite, while ghrelin triggers hunger and plays a large role in initiating eating.

    When you’re not well-rested, your leptin levels plummet and your ghrelin levels rise; one study found that subjects who slept for 5 hours had 15.5% lower leptin than those who slept a full 8 hours, and 14.9% higher ghrelin. This means that you’ll not only be eating less healthy, more caloric food—you’ll also feel hungrier and seek food more frequently.

    Sleepless and stress-full

    Among the many benefits of proper sleep is that it can reduce stress, which, in turn, can help reduce your weight. How? It comes back to another hormone—this time, cortisol.

    Cortisol is a hormone that is released in response to stress, and its levels are closely tied to our natural sleep/wake cycles. So when those cycles get disrupted, so do those levels, causing a spike in cortisol in the bloodstream.

    This spike doesn’t just make you feel stressed out. Cortisol causes fat to be stored around the organs (especially visceral organs, which translates to belly fat), and also causes fat cells to become larger. Studies have shown that elevated cortisol can cause increased belly fat even in otherwise slender individuals.

    Sleep and Weight Loss

    Metabolism malfunction

    You know how not sleeping well makes you feel groggy and lethargic? Well, turns out your metabolism feels pretty much the same way.

    When you’re well-rested, your metabolism is a well-oiled machine, efficiently processing the calories that you consume. On the flip side, when you’re in a state of sleep deprivation, your groggy metabolism can’t keep up with your food intake. What causes this breakdown? It all comes down to insulin.

    See, insulin plays an important role in helping our body convert sugar into energy for our cells. When our body can’t properly use insulin (insulin resistance) that sugar remains in our bloodstream and eventually is converted into fat. This is the case for those who have diabetes—and, research shows, for those who aren’t getting enough sleep.

    One study showed that after just four nights of short sleep, subjects’ ability to respond to insulin decreased by 16%—a difference comparable to that between the cells of obese vs. lean people—and the insulin sensitivity of their fat cells dropped by 30%. The latter is particularly important because fat cells play a crucial role in storing and releasing energy. Meanwhile, insulin resistance in the brain means that insulin can’t do its job of reducing hunger cues.

    One report put it in stark terms: “Chronic sleep loss can reduce the capacity of even young adults to perform basic metabolic functions, such as processing and storing carbohydrates or regulating hormone secretion.”

    As if your metabolism wasn’t getting a big enough blow from the insulin resistance, there’s this: sleep deprivation reduces the production of thyroid-stimulating-hormone, which is an essential player in proper metabolism. Ouch.

    Too sleepy to sweat

    Anyone who has tried to slim down or get into better shape knows the importance of regular exercise, as well as how tough it can be to get into a workout routine. To the surprise of exactly nobody, not getting enough sleep makes it much more difficult to achieve this.

    It’s intuitive—when you’re tired, you don’t want to go exert a bunch of energy. And studies show that subjects with sleep problems report a significant reduction in their levels of physical activity. What’s more, the increased ghrelin and decreased leptin levels associated with sleep loss mean an overall reduction in energy expenditure.

    And if you do drag your tired butt to the gym, you’ll be fighting an uphill battle to keep yourself there for a full workout. Sleep deprivation increases your perceived exertion and increases the likelihood that you’ll cut your sweat session short.

    Sweet dreams for good genes

    Your lifestyle is a huge factor in determining your weight, but the fact is that genetics also play a role. This can be super discouraging to those who are working hard to eat right and work out but still can’t lose the weight because of a genetic predisposition to a higher BMI.

    However, research shows that adequate sleep can reduce the influence your genetics have on your weight. In a study of identical twins that looked at BMI, genetics, and lifestyle factors including diet, exercise, and sleep habits, they found that the BMI variations in those who slept adequately were less dependent on genetics. However, those who slept less saw 70% of their BMI variations come from hereditary factors.

    Sleep and Weight Loss

    The final word

    From the food you choose to eat, to how your body processes that food, to your workouts, to the relative impact of all of these components, sleep influences every aspect of your weight. Diet and exercise may get more press, but science has made it increasingly clear that sleep is the essential third pillar of fitness.

    So if losing weight, getting fit, or just maintaining a healthy BMI is one of your resolutions, getting enough shut-eye needs to be as well.


    Interested in the latest ways a good bed can help you sleep? Read more here.


    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep


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  • Certifiably proud: Awards and industry certifications we hold.
    Certifiably proud: Awards and industry certifications we hold.

    Every company in the industry talks about how great their beds are. But, as in most of life, independent verification is a good thing. Particularly when it comes to your bed. If you’re taking care of your health, you spend about a third of your life in your bed. What materials went into it? Are they safe? Have they been rigorously tested by reputable outside sources?

    At Reverie, that answer is yes. An obsessive yes, in fact. We are truly dedicated to bringing you a happy, healthy bed. So we aggressively pursue certifications and reviews that are meaningful. Here’s a thorough guide to what outside sources say about our mattresses, power beds and linens.

    Consumer Reports magazine

    See what Consumer Reports had to say about our DreamCell® mattress here.

    Women’s Choice Award® - 10 Times

    The Women’s Choice Award is based on surveying women about products they own and would recommend. Since women are the primary shoppers for home items, this carries special significance when it comes to bedroom furniture. Over 96% of women surveyed would recommend their Reverie power bed to a friend. And over 98% of women who own our full sleep system (i.e., both the mattress and the power base), would recommend them to a friend. We’ve won the award for our power bed (aka power bases) every year since 2012 and the award for our sleep systems since 2016.

    Women's Choice Awards for Sleep Systems and Adjustable Bases

    OEKO-TEX® Standard 100

    Truth is, in the real world, many products can’t be manufactured fully organically and still be functional or reasonably affordable. Which makes OEKO-TEX Standard 100 especially relevant … in real-world terms, it’s basically the next best thing to organic. OEKO-TEX Standard 100 is rigorous about safe levels of substances like chemical flame retardants, pesticides, formaldehyde, colorants and allergic dyes. It also restricts chemicals like formaldehyde and VOC emission levels. OEKO-TEX Standard 100 means a product was tested for over 700 harmful substances through independent labs. In many cases, their standard is more stringent than legally required. They also regulate substances that scientific data show may be harmful but aren’t yet legally banned.

    In another show of toughness, OEKO-TEX Standard 100 certification is not awarded unless all components of the product meet their standards. In the case of a mattress, that means the foam, the outer cover, the threads used in quilting, the zippers–i.e., when they say everything, they mean everything. And the closer to the skin or the younger the intended user, the more stringent the standards. OEKO-TEX also insists on criteria regarding environmentally-conscious production.

    Reverie is proud to have OEKO-TEX Standard 100 certification for all the natural latex components of our Dream Supreme™ mattress lines, including the foam springs and comfort layers.  

    Reverie DreamCell all natural latex foam springs

    CertiPUR-US®

    This certification comes from a nonprofit group that monitors the foam used in mattresses, whether it’s latex, memory foam or some other polyurethane. A versatile and far-reaching certification, CertiPUR-US monitors foam for toxic and carcinogenic materials within the foam itself like lead, formaldehyde, mercury, unsafe flame retardants, etc. CertiPUR-US certification also means that VOC levels (sometimes referred to as off-gassing) are low and within safe ranges. Lastly, CertiPUR-US certifies foam for manufacturing practices that look out for everybody’s future; namely, they strictly prohibit any chemicals that contribute to ozone depletion.

    Reverie has CertiPUR-US certification for the memory foam used in our Hybrid mattresses as well as our RevTek™ polyurethane foam.


    Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)

    GOTS is for fabrics, and it’s the strictest level of certification—meaning no toxic stuff can pass through here. It’s recognized around the world as the leading processing standard for organic textiles, defining criteria that cover environmental, health, and social concerns. A GOTS certification gives the consumer a worldwide guarantee of quality.

    There are two classes of GOTS certification: “organic” and “made with X% organic.” The only difference between these two classes has to do with the proportion of organic fibers in the material. A product carrying the “organic” label has more than 95% certified organic fibers, while “made with X% organic” has at least 70% organic fibers.

    There are also restrictions concerning what the other 5% or 30% can contain. Certain additions—like formaldehyde, heavy metals, chlorine bleach and polyurethane—are strictly prohibited. For additional safety and authenticity, all organic fibers must be kept separate from conventional fibers during production. And there are corporate responsibility requirements as well: manufacturers must adhere to a number of standards regarding environmental stewardship and fair labor practices.

    Reverie uses certified organic GOTS materials for our organic linens as well as our organic pillow covers.

    Intertek® Quality Performance Mark (QPM)

    This is a little-known - but brutal - durability test for mattresses. It basically involves abusing them repeatedly with a giant, heavy roller. We are proud to carry the Intertek certification on all our mattresses, so you can be certain they will provide you with proper support for ten years, and likely well beyond. In addition, we also have the Intertek QPM designation for having met their rigorous flammability standards.

    Reverie 9T power bed aka adjustable base

    UL-962

    UL-962 is the U.S. standard for home furnishings, certifying that safety standards for electrical, flammability and injury risk have been met. Again, they don’t take anybody’s word for it. Furniture is tested by a nationally recognized and accredited independent lab, ETL.

    All Reverie power beds (aka, adjustable power bases) have been certified to standard UL-962.

    Electronics certifications

    Reverie power beds are:

    • FCC-certified to meet safety standards for electromagnetic interference.

    • SIG-certified for any Bluetooth® modules we use. SIG is an independent organization that certifies that products meet all Bluetooth requirements.

    • UL-listed for linear actuators. Underwriters Laboratory is a premier certification organization for electronics.

    Power bed durability testing

    Even though it isn’t required for power beds to be sold, our standards are high. We have the most strenuous electromechanical load durability testing in the industry. Our standard weight limit across all Reverie  power beds is 850 pounds, which includes the weight of the mattress and anybody/anything on top of it. That’s up to 200 lbs. more than most of our competitors.

    A final word on certifications

    We are all citizens of the same planet, and Reverie is committed to protecting it. We firmly believe that healthy materials, quality parts and safety in design are integral to a restorative sleep experience. Durability is incredibly important as well, and we stand by all of our products with strong warranties. You can rest easy on a Reverie bed.


    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    The Bluetooth® word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIF, Inc. Any use of such marks by Ascion LLC is under license.

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  • Reverie In The News 2018
    Reverie In The News 2018

    Here's what people are saying about Reverie out in the big wide world in 2018, with our most recent press coverage first. Click the link to read the story.

    MAY 2018

    Bustle.com 

    Our CMO Lisa Tan talks to Bustle.com about sleep disorders and how they can affect relationships. 

    APRIL 2018

    Consumer Reports 

    Our CMO Lisa Tan is quoted in an informative article about power beds, aka adjustable bases. 

    MARCH 2018

    Women's Choice Award® 

    Reverie wins the award in two categories. Again. The award is based on what women owners say about our beds. Details here.

    Mini magazine

    Nice story on all the ways Reverie power beds are great for moms. Read it here. 

    Romper.com

    Reverie Advisory Board member Dr. Dawn Dore-Stites, a pediatric sleep expert, is prominently featured by Romper, a popular site for moms.

    Readers Digest 

    Reverie Advisory Board member Benjamin Smarr, PhD, gives insight on coping with daylight savings time in an in-depth article here. 

    FEBRUARY 2018

    USA Weekly

    Our CEO, Martin Rawls-Meehan is interviewed about the sleep biz.

    The Wall Street Journal

    Our busy and fearless CMO Lisa Tan makes the WSJ (with a full accompanying illustration!) where they discuss her preferred method for de-stressing. Check it out here. 

    JANUARY 2018

    Active Times

    CEO Martin Rawls-Meehan discusses high tech sleep with this fitness-focused blog. Story here.

    Credit.com

    Reverie's Chief Marketing Office Lisa Tan talks New Years resolutions and weight loss. Story here.

    CES 2018

    We went to CES, the prestigious Consumer Electronics Show, for our first time ever. And we made quite an impression with our technology and our mind-control bed.

    Innovation and Tech Today

    Their assistant editor checks out our mind-control bed and interviews us on video at CES.

    A top tech magazine gives us their CES Editor's Choice Award.

    Innovation and Tech Today magazine gave us their Editor's Choice Award for 2018. Story here.  

    Check out our CES video. 

    Reuters TV

    They go to CES and feature our bed in this episode. Reverie coverage starts at 2:15 in the video.

    Sleep tips with Tech Republic at CES.

    Video sleep tips from our CEO, Martin Rawls-Meehan. See video.

    Our smart bed with Tech Republic.

    Our CEO discusses how reading your brain waves will lead to better sleep in the future. See video.

    In-Style magazine

    Our CMO, Lisa Tan, gives advice on best sleep positions, depending on what your situation is.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

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  • Sleeping with a Newborn Baby: An Ob/Gyn Gives Advice
    Sleeping with a Newborn Baby: An Ob/Gyn Gives Advice

    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    Congratulations, and welcome to motherhood for the first, second, or greater time. It is the hardest job you will ever have but it comes with the greatest benefits package. For me, the most difficult part of the newborn period is sleep deprivation. My daughter needed to nurse every 2-3 hours for one week, and every feeding felt like an eternity. My husband is very helpful, but he needed sleep once he went back to work. And even though there were very special bonding moments with my little girl during the night, it still felt very lonely being the only person up multiple times while extremely fatigued and hormonal. I know you have been there, too, my friend! So, what can we do to maximize sleep time and to make the most of the little sleep we can get? Here are my favorite tips for sleeping with a newborn baby, all of which I have been using since the birth of my second child just a few months ago.

    sleeping with a newborn baby

    Sleep When You Can

    Everyone says it, and it sounds so easy to sleep while your baby sleeps. But it’s hard! You have bottles and/or burp cloths to wash, visitors to entertain, and a precious bundle to stare at for hours and hours. All of these threaten to rob the much-needed sleep of a new mom. First, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Have family or friends come to hold the baby, change diapers and/or do household chores while you take a nap. If you do not have people who will help in this way, and you can afford it, go ahead and hire someone. Many night nurses or postpartum doulas will come to your home to help during the newborn period. And it doesn’t have to be for a long time, either. We hired someone to help for several nights around week 6 when my exhaustion and my baby’s crying were at their peak. These people are angels in disguise. If you don’t feel comfortable with help overnight, hire someone to assist during the day so you can nap. Sleep is a necessity after having a baby, not an option. You’ll be better able to function after some rest.

    Sleep Well

    Once you’re able to sneak away, make sure your sleeping environment is perfect. Hang blackout curtains, use a noise machine and wear comfortable pajamas. You can finally enjoy sleeping on your back again! If you had a c-section, keep an extra pillow in the bed so you can place it over your abdomen as a brace when you cough, laugh, or sneeze. An adjustable bed is amazing for post-C-section recovery because it raises you into a sitting position (for nursing or getting into and out of bed) preventing you from overworking your abdominal muscles until recovery is well underway. The adjustability of a bed is also helpful after a vaginal delivery, especially if you had tears since you can find the sitting angle at which there is minimal vaginal pain.

    Another tip: set yourself up for success by having everything you need near your bed. On my bedside table, I had two pacifiers, two burp cloths, a nursing pillow with pocket that held gas drops and vitamin D (important to give babies that are exclusively breastfed). Other stuff on the table? My journal of my baby’s activity (I was so tired that I couldn’t remember which side I nursed on the last time), plus water and snacks for me. I also had a basket with all diaper changing supplies, because walking across the room to the changing pad was too much sometimes.

    Sleeping Babies

    A sleeping baby is a thing of beauty. They need the same things we do to rest: a dark and quiet room at a comfortable temperature. Babies also need a bedtime routine, a nonverbal way of telling them that it’s time to settle down. Our routine was going into the bedroom, turning on the noise machine, swaddling, turning off the lights, and rocking for 5-10 minutes until she showed signs of sleepiness (yawning, closing her eyes, breathing slowing down a bit). Then I placed her in a co-sleeper and patted her leg until she was nearly asleep. There are plenty of variations on this theme; find what works for you and your baby, because you will be doing it multiple times a day for several months.

    You get to decide where your baby sleeps. Recent recommendations say that sleeping in a separate area (bassinet, co-sleeper, crib) in the same room as parents is best. However, that must be balanced with your ability to rest. My babies were both very noisy sleepers. As long as they were in the room, I could not sleep, which was not safe for me or them. So, they slept in a co-sleeper in my attached bathroom. I was near enough to hear a cry or cough but far enough away to not hear every grunt and sigh. This is a very personal decision that you should make with input from your pediatrician.

    Mommy Guilt

    A special word for all moms: let the mommy guilt go. Whether it be about breastfeeding,sleeping in the same room, asking someone else to care for your baby, or balancing this baby with other children–just do your best, then move on! This is a beautiful time but also a tough time, and it will pass quickly. Take a deep breath, get rest when you can, and try to savor the quiet moments with your newborn. If you are feeling overwhelmed or depressed, seek help immediately; you can’t and shouldn’t deal with these emotions alone. As one of my favorite people used to say to me, and this is advice definitely worth taking: be kind to yourself.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

     

    AmeliaBailey

    Dr. Bailey is an ObGyn and a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist. She treats patients who are having difficulty conceiving or who have complicated gynecologic conditions, following women throughout early pregnancy. Her expertise in sleep and women’s health, including pregnancy, stem from professional as well as personal interests. As a mother of both a newborn and a toddler, she knows how important it is to get a good night’s rest. She has used the Reverie Sleep System throughout both of her pregnancy and postpartum periods with excellent results.

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  • Best New Bedtime Picture Books
    Best New Bedtime Picture Books

    There’s something special about reading a bedtime story with a child. Many kids are extra sweet at bedtime, so you get quality time and bonding to the max. You’ve likely already shared your favorite classic books with your kids or grandkids. Several times, right? Goodnight, Moon. The Hungry Caterpillar. The Velveteen Rabbit. The Missing Piece. Green Eggs and Ham. They’re all so wonderful, sigh. But eventually, you need some new material. So what can you read with them now?

    Have no fear. We recently went to a good bookstore for kids in search of best new picture books that might wind up being classics.

    We’ll start by sharing our own criteria for what makes a good picture book. It must have a good, engaging story. The writing has to sparkle. The pictures need to feel fresh, graphic or otherwise charming. It needs to be human. And the book needs to be original in some way, not the same old sappy stuff and clichéd stories. Lastly is the “it” factor: the book should evoke some kind of emotional response. Ultimately, we need to empathize. Or laugh. Or be delighted. Or enlightened. Truth be told, our standards are very high, and most books wind up in the rejected pile.

    Looking for books that have won prestigious children’s literary awards like the Caldecott or Newbery medals can be helpful, but not always. They’re usually easy to spot, with large embossed gold or silver stickers at the top. We’ve found these awards generally guarantee a certain quality of writing and illustrations, but don’t necessarily mean you’ll get a good, engaging story. It also seems like books with a sense of humor are often overlooked by the judges. So don’t limit yourself to award-winners.

    After weeding through books for several hours, we’re happy to report that the genre is alive and well. Here are some newer bedtime books on the shelves right now that are worth a look. The books don’t have an age range on them, so we guesstimated.

    Unlike Other Monsters

    Unlike Other Monsters

    Written by Audrey Vernick, Illustrated by Colin Jack
    Children 5-7

    Zander is a monster. And monsters do not like or need friends. Until a little red bird hangs out with Zander and interrupts his world view. A humorous story with fun, active illustrations. More here.

     

    Still A Gorilla

    Still a Gorilla

    Written by Kim Norman, Illustrated by Chad Geran
    Children 3-5

    Cute story about a young gorilla who longs to be someone else. Big, flat, almost Japanese-style illustrations. For the pictures, think Curious George meets PokemonMore here.

     

    Octicorn

    Hello, My Name is Octicorn

    Written by Kevin Diller, Illustrated by Justin Lowe
    Children 6-8

    Half unicorn, half octopus, Octicorn feels insecure because he’s different. In the book, Octicorn works through all the reasons he’d be a good friend. Turns out, they’re excellent reasons. Expressive, earnest, mostly black and white illustrations with a splash of color. Nice story for a child who’s different or to teach kids about tolerance. More here

     

    Pigeon Drives The Bus

    Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!

    Written and Illustrated by Mo Willems
    Caldecott Honor Book
    Children 5-7

    A mischievous pigeon tries every excuse and guilt trip in the book, all the ones that kids typically use to try to get their way. Simple, doodle-style illustrations that evoke an old-style cartoon. We think most kids will be able to see themselves in this book, a great quality for a book to have. More here

     

    Day The Crayons Quit

    The Day the Crayons Quit

    Written by Drew Daywalt, Illustrated by Oliver Jeffers
    EB White Read-Aloud Award
    Children 7-10

    Duncan wants to color but his crayons are tired. So they all go on strike. Each crayon writes him a hilarious protest letter based on its typical duties by color. Red is mad that he has to work so hard year-round, especially Christmas. Beige is tired of being the poor man’s brown. Full disclosure: we are in love with this book. The “delight” factor is high. Just buy it! More here. 

     

    Mixed Me

    Mixed Me

    Written by Taye Diggs, Illustrated by Shane W. Evans
    Children 6-9

    Written by actor Taye Diggs, this is about Mike, a mixed race boy with an awesome head of curly hair. In a rhyme, he proudly explains who he is to the world, with love and support from his parents. Colorful and modern illustrations. Exuberant and freeing text. More here. 

     

    On The Night You Were Born

    On the Night You Were Born

    Written and Illustrated by Nancy Tillman
    New York Times Bestseller
    Children 2-5

    Sweetest book since Goodnight Moon. A parent poetically recounts the events of a magical night. On the night her child was born, word rang out across the land. The polar bears danced and all of nature celebrated. A book that is validating, comforting and just all-around AWESOME. More here. 

     

    Quit Calling Me Monster

    Quit Calling Me a Monster

    Written by Jory John, Illustrated by Bob Shea
    Children 6-9

    An engaging rant by a monster about being called names, even though he rather deserves them due to bad behavior. A witty romp with a protagonist who rather reminded us of Oscar the Grouch. Endearing, active illustrations. More here.

     

    The Wonderful Things You Will Be

    The Wonderful Things You Will Be

    Written and Illustrated by Emily Winfield Martin
    Children 3-5

    A lovely rhyme as a new parent speculates on all the possibilities life may hold for her child. Somehow this book perfectly walks the line between schmaltz and honest emotion. Charming illustrations. More here.

     

    Voice Of Freedom

    Voice of Freedom/The Fannie Lou Hamer Story

    Written by Carole Boston Weatherford
    Illustrated by Ekua Holmes
    Robert F. Sibert Honor Book
    Caldecott Honor Book
    Coretta Scott King Award/John Steptoe New Talent
    Children 9-12

    This book is a serious work for children and somewhat hard to explain, because it deals with racism. The youngest of 20 children, Fannie Lou Hamer was born to sharecroppers and grew up to be a civil rights leader. Carole Boston Weatherford, a writer of many books about African American heroes, has taken the true elements of Hamer’s life and translated them into a compilation of different short stories and prose. The result is moving, sad, joyful, angry, inspiring and true. The fine art illustrations are incredibly beautiful and unique. This book would be best read a few pages at a time and discussed in detail between adult and child. More here.

    Lastly

    If you want to look for picture books on your own, we’ll make a plea for going to a good local brick-and-mortar bookstore. It’s way, way easier to find good books in person than online, unless you already know exactly what you want. In a bookstore, you can always read the entire book, unlike online where you just get a preview. Plus bookstores are places full of knowledge and great vibes, the kind of business that’s great to have in your neighborhood.

    Happy reading, and may your little one drift off to sleep easily, enriched by a great book and your loving, undivided attention.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    Read more »
  • 10 Hospital Sleeping Tips for Expecting Moms
    10 Hospital Sleeping Tips for Expecting Moms

    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    You’ve been planning for this moment for months, maybe even years, and it is almost time to meet your new baby. Congratulations! For some of you, this will be your first overnight stay in a hospital. While I strongly believe the hospital is far and away the safest and best place to have your baby, it is not an environment that is conducive to a good night’s sleep. But, let’s be honest, neither is motherhood. Here are a few tips to help you get as much rest as possible so you can take excellent care of your little one.

    #1 Your overnight support person is your ally

    Your overnight support person may be the most important part of your sleep plan.  He or she should be excited about being helpful and should be supportive of and respectful of your boundaries.  Communicate very clearly with this person before, during, and after your hospital stay about how he or she can help you.

    #2 Visitor control can be key

    Let the front desk staff and your nurses know if you want to refuse visitors at any point to get rest.  The staff can be your greatest advocate and may even pretend that it is their recommendation that you do not have visitors at that time.

    10 hospital sleeping tips for expecting moms

    #3 Think about your pajamas

    Pack comfortable pajamas- both heavy pajamas and light ones since the room temperature can be unpredictable.  Layering is helpful as is wearing very loose clothing, especially around your waistline if you have a c-section.

    #4 Take advantage of the comforts of home

    Bring your own pillow (or pillows) and maybe even your own blanket.  This will increase your comfort level dramatically.

    #5 Control those blaring hospital lights.

    An eye mask will be your best friend if your room’s window faces the east or west and will allow you to try to rest anytime of the day.

    10 hospital sleeping tips for expecting moms

    #6 Mitigate the noise

    A noise machine or speaker playing your own music can drown out noise in the hallway and relax you.  Have your playlists ready before going to the hospital. Theft in some hospitals is an issue, so assign your overnight support person to hang onto any electronics.

    #7 Lights out early

    An early bedtime may be beneficial to maximize the number of hours you can attempt (interrupted) sleep as some doctors begin seeing hospital patients very early in the morning (think 5:30am in a busy hospital).  You can always go to sleep again right after they leave.

    #8 Skip the interruptions

    Request that no vital signs be taken overnight.  This should not be a problem as long as you are healthy and had an uncomplicated delivery.

    10 hospital sleeping tips for expecting moms

    #9 Minimize your baby’s crying if possible

    If your baby is as content as can be while being held but wakes up and cries uncontrollably as soon as you lay him or her down, your baby may be experiencing reflux, which is milk and stomach fluid moving backwards into the throat instead of staying in the stomach. This is likely temporary, but temporary may mean days or may mean months. Initially, ask the nurse to help you prop the bassinet up in a safe way so that your baby’s head is higher than his or her stomach.  This may decrease the reflux.

    #10 Send the baby to the nursery if you need to

    It is a very personal decision to either room-in with your newborn or to send them to the nursery. If you have had any complications and need more than routine recovery– or if you do not have a helpful support person – it may be in your best interest to send your baby to the nursery. As the mom, YOU get to decide. Do what’s right for you.

    It is extremely important to take care of yourself so that you can take care of your newborn.  Good luck, and welcome to the most difficult and rewarding experience of your life.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    Dr Amelia Bailey

    Dr. Amelia P. Bailey is a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility (REI) specialist in Memphis, Tennessee. She currently serves on Reverie’s Sleep Advisory Board.

    Read more »
  • The Complete Adjustable Bed Buying Guide
    The Complete Adjustable Bed Buying Guide

    In recent years, sales of adjustable power bed bases have grown exponentially. Yet, when it’s time for a sleep upgrade, many people still think only about mattresses. They remain unaware of the big difference in sleep quality that a power bed can provide, mistakenly equating them with hospital beds. With all the technology now infused into adjustable beds, nothing could be further from the truth.

    An adjustable power base gives you the ability to control and tweak the position you sleep in, which can lead to longer and more restful sleep. It can also reduce snoring and alleviate pain. And then there’s the lifestyle perks. Like finally being able to read in bed comfortably with support under your knees.  Or drifting off to a massage every night. Or programming the head of the bed to rise automatically in the morning to help you wake up. And more.

    All in all, an adjustable foundation is a big value-add in a big busy world. But with so many bed frames on the market, how do you go about choosing? It depends on your needs of course. But here are seven important things to consider.

    The complete adjustable bed buying guide

    #1  How good is the engineering?

    Perhaps no other piece of furniture is as complex as an adjustable foundation in that it moves. How many pieces of furniture do more than swivel or go up and down? In the case of higher end bases, they move in so many different ways. You’re ponying up a decent sum here, so take your time to check it out. Lay in the bed and try every single function on the adjustable bed remote control. Does the bed move quickly on command? Are the motions jerky or smooth? Be sure to evaluate with your ears as well. A good base will operate quietly as a result of the high quality adjustable bed motors. Ask your salesperson a ton of questions and do some homework online. Does the company building your base have a sizable product line and at least a million bases behind them? The importance of great engineering can’t be overemphasized.

    The complete adjustable bed buying guide

    #2  How much science went into the design?

    So let’s assume the base has acceptable engineering. The next thing to ask is, how did they develop the positions and features? For example, lumbar support is worthless unless it’s specifically developed to align with the spine. Is the massage feature something that just shakes the bed, or is it a sophisticated, travelling motion, developed using the principles of physics? Is the Anti-Snore position exactly the optimal angle for most people? Did doctors or scientists give input into developing the bed? Inspect the edges, seams and all other aspects of the bed for nice finishes, solid materials, smooth joints and overall sturdiness. And while you’re at it, think about your personal design aesthetic. A lot of bases out there look like bulky fabric-clad pontoon boats rather than sleek pieces of machinery. Function is important, but style matters, too.

    The complete adjustable bed buying guide

    #3  What features does it offer?

    An entry-level base will usually allow you to operate the head and foot of the base. Make sure the operation is smooth and that those sleeping positions feel comfortable to you. Just because there are strings on your wallet doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get a well-made product. More sophisticated adjustable power bases have additional desirable features like variable massage levels, enhanced neck support and life-changing presets like Anti-Snore and Zero Gravity, which simulates weightlessness. Premium power bases let you control the bed through your smartphone and program multiple settings to run at specific times. You may even find some under-bed nightlights.

    #4  Split adjustable bed base or not?

    The reality of any bed is that usually two people are sleeping in it. When that’s the case, a split adjustable bed is something to consider, because it allows both people to adjust the bed independently. Make sure the manufacturer provides two bed remotes for that purpose, and that each of you can adjust the other side of the bed with your remote, not just your own side. This can come in handy for any couple dealing with snoring or sleep apnea. If you decide to go with a split adjustable base, your mattress becomes a part of the equation. You can order a Split King mattress, which allows independent movement on both sides and is essentially two separate twin mattresses with their own separate domains. If you like to sleep while cuddling, make sure any partially split mattress moves well with the base in the foot region. Split bases are sometimes offered in Split Queen size, but most manufacturers only offer them in Split King.

    The complete adjustable bed buying guide

    #5  Do you want it to fit within an existing bed frame?

    Already have a bed frame you love? The better adjustable bed bases have been specifically designed to fit within many standard types of bed frames. They have dimensions and certain compact crossbars to make that happen. They also come with different leg heights or adjustable bed risers that you can swap out to put your mattress at the right height. Ask the manufacturer for measurement specs to see if your bed will work. A serious maker of adjustable bases will have such bed size specs available for you.

    The complete adjustable bed buying guide

    #6  Remotes and apps add to the experience

    A good adjustable base comes with a remote that’s simple to use. If it’s back lit, that’s a plus. Ditto if it’s wireless. Some manufacturers also realize that you can never have too many charging stations and have gone to the trouble of creating a quality remote cradle that also charges your smartphone. If you’re into more sophisticated operations, ask your salesperson for a demo of the company’s smartphone app. A high-end app will let you easily program multiple positions and massage settings with timings.

    The complete adjustable bed buying guide

    #7  Who made your bed? Warranties, service and reputation.

    Many companies have gotten into the reclining bed market in recent years, looking to make a quick buck without knowing much about power beds. Avoid them. A power adjustable foundation is a complex piece of equipment. Like a car, it has moving parts, electronics and a motor. So be sure you’re dealing with a company that’s built a lot of electric beds and has a reputation for standing behind them. Also, a great bed warranty is the sign of a great power base. Check out some of the leading bed sellers, and you’ll find they’re pretty oblique about the warranties on their bases. That is because most of them farm out their power bases. Some even require you to ship the base back for service. A good company will clearly call out its policy:  how long labor is covered, how long parts are covered and how long the motor is covered. Some companies guarantee the motor for as long as 20 years.

    And do yourself a favor before you buy … call the customer service department and see who answers the phone. Does the company care enough to handle customer service in-house? Or have they outsourced that, too? A good quality base will have few or no problems, but if you have questions about operation or installation, a well-trained customer service team is highly desirable.

    The world of sleep is no longer flat.

    A power adjustable base helps you to settle into your own perfect sleeping position, which often involves a raised head or a little support under your knees. With stress in abundance and time for sleep in low supply, a power base gives you a whole new toolbox of sleep options. Choose wisely and start enjoying them pronto.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    adjustable bases for pregnant women

    Read more »
  • Pregnancy Sleeping Positions: A Pregnant Doctor Hacks our Bed
    Pregnancy Sleeping Positions: A Pregnant Doctor Hacks our Bed

    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    As an Ob-Gyn in the third trimester of my second pregnancy, I am keenly aware of the many changes the female body undergoes while doing the very important work of growing a new life.  Hormones surge, ligaments and skin stretch, and bones shift to accommodate your little one, who starts off as one cell and becomes trillions of cells by birth. Momentous, certainly. But it also sounds uncomfortable, right? It is. So what can we do to make sure these nine months are more joy than pain while nurturing our future astrophysicists? One of the most important steps is ensuring adequate nightly amounts of peaceful sleep in spite of our frequent bathroom visits.

    Pregnancy sleep positions: a pregnant doctor hacks our bed

    Dr. Amelia Bailey, who is currently pregnant, came up with a DreamCell™ configuration for expectant mothers

    On becoming a side sleeper

    During your first trimester, you can sleep the same way you always have, even if you sleep on your stomach or back. Second trimester, though, we have to start making adjustments to improve comfort. I encourage side sleeping, a position that maximizes blood flow to the baby.

    Pregnancy sleep positions: a pregnant doctor hacks our bed

    How Dr. Bailey rearranged her DreamCell™ springs

    I bought my Reverie Dream Sleep System a couple years ago, and have had it for both pregnancies. It features a mattress that can be switched up to accommodate life changes.

    This allowed me to develop my own personal DreamCell configuration that provides support for our beautifully enlarging bellies in a side-sleeping position (see image). Because the pink (softest) foam cells are in a line down the center, your body will more naturally stay on its side once you lie down in that position. You will notice that there are blue coils in the area where your tummy will rest to provide additional support there. To view a chart of the full configuration, click here.

    Why a power adjustable bed can help

    Because my Reverie bed has a power adjustable bed base, I can also adjust the head and foot heights to provide the support I need. The foot of my bed is completely flat, which keeps my back comfortable, while the head of my bed is almost 15 degrees (I go to the Anti-Snore position, then lower the head for 1-2 seconds). This just happens to be the arrangement that is most comfortable for me, but you should play around with the heights and find what works best for you. During your third trimester, you can use the same cell configuration and adjustment tricks but may need to reposition the head and foot heights to increase comfort levels. There are not a lot of studies that show a safe intensity of massage during pregnancy, so I play it safe and avoid use of the massage function on my bed until after baby is born.

    Let’s talk pillows and linens

    Pregnancy sleep positions: a pregnant doctor hacks our bedMany women feel warmer during pregnancy, so using bed sheets in natural, breathable fibers or sleeping with a fan may improve your sleep.  I also use a large U-shaped body pillow that stretches to below my knees in front and back. This pillow provides support between my knees, under my tummy, and beneath my head while acting as a posterior barrier to prevent me from rolling onto my back. If you are a natural side sleeper, you may only need a one-sided pillow such as the Cool Down or Sweet Zone™ latex pillow under your head and the adjustable Sweet Slumber adjustable pillow between your knees. Look for pillows that meet your specific needs.

    Rest, rest and more rest

    Sleep is paramount during pregnancy to support maternal and fetal well-being and development.  Getting comfortable may require trial and error as well as frequent changes while your body grows to house your little one, but it is worth the effort. A focus on resting while you are pregnant will pay great dividends during the upcoming nighttime feeding and snuggle sessions that you are about to have. Good luck; I will be in the same boat!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    Dr Amelia Bailey

    Dr. Amelia P. Bailey is a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility (REI) specialist in Memphis, Tennessee. She is the mom of two young children and currently serves on Reverie’s Advisory Board.

    Read more »
  • How I Achieve Work Life Balance by Dr. Amelia Bailey, new mom
    How I Achieve Work Life Balance by Dr. Amelia Bailey, new mom

    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    My life is probably not much different than yours: many people vying for my time and attention, a to-do list that is never-ending, and too few hours in the day to get it all done. Saving time for myself is a luxury. I think it is called the daily grind because it cannot be done without coffee.

    If you fall into the latter category, you aren’t alone. Everyone is there at some point; the smartest people find a way to manage work life balance gracefully. While my life is always a work in progress, I have recently spent a good bit of time rearranging the weekdays in order to feel more productive in all areas of my life: family, career, exercise, personal growth, and possibly most importantly sleep.  That sounds great; but how to achieve work life balance?  The following has worked for me: prioritize responsibilities and needs, set a schedule for the weekdays, and operate efficiently.

    Prioritize your responsibility and needs

    This is easier said than done but is a crucial first step.  So, set aside some time to do this thoughtfully.  Ask yourself what is pushed to the side when you have a looming deadline? Those things are closer to the bottom. What can you not ignore for too long? Those items are near the top. For me, sleep is very near the top of the list. Without rest, the body cannot keep moving, and the mind is unable to function at its highest capacity. While we all skimp on the number of zzz’s we get from time to time, it is essential to make up those missed hours of sleep in order to live a full, healthy life.

    Set a schedule

    First, write out the concrete portions of your schedule (work hours, recurring appointments, exercise classes); then fill in the remaining time with other activities based on their order of importance on your list of priorities. For example, here is my Monday plan:

    Monday

    5:30am            Wake up

    6am                 Exercise class

    7am                 Get ready for work

    7:30am            Help daughter get up and out to breakfast

    8:30am            Work day

    4:30pm            Drive home and play with daughter

    6:15pm            Dinner with my husband and daughter

    7:30pm            Help toddler get ready for bed and off to sleep

    8pm                 Read for work or fun

    9pm                 Get ready for bed

    9:30pm            Lights off!

     

    It may seem very planned, and it is. This is what works for me; you need to develop a weekday schedule that fits your life. Hopefully yours allows more time for leisure (if so, good for you!). I like to schedule weekdays so that I can relax on the weekends and enjoy that free time without guilt. I recommend including others in your planning process, especially people who live with you or are affected by your schedule. They can be great allies and encourage you to stick with it.

    Work efficiently

    In order to do this, you must set time limits for focused attention spans during which you minimize outside distractions (phone, email, interruptions) but also factor in breaks. Experiment with the length of your attention blocks. For some, 50 minutes of focus with 10 minutes of rest works best while others need 25 minutes on and 5 minutes off. The important part is to have a break that relaxes you. Most of us are staring at a screen or written words while intently concentrating, so the computer or phone screen should not be part of your rest period. You can stretch, meditate, or even zone out. Whatever clears and rejuvenates your mind.

    Change is hard, and old habits are tough to break.  I understand, because I am currently in that process.  Be sure to get buy-in and support from the people closest to you; they will want to see positive change in your life, and you may even motivate them to do the same.  Also never underestimate the power of being rested in order to complete all of your other goals. Good luck; let’s do this together!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    AmeliaBailey

    Dr. Amelia P. Bailey is a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility (REI) specialist in Memphis, Tennessee.  She is the Director of Minimally Invasive Surgery for her practice and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  She completed residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville, where she served as Chief Resident, followed by a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.  While in Boston, she was a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Medical School and conducted joint research projects between Boston Children’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    As an REI, Dr. Bailey treats patients who are having difficulty conceiving or who have complicated gynecologic conditions and follows women throughout early pregnancy.  Her expertise in sleep and women’s health, including pregnancy, stem from professional as well as personal interests.  As the mother of two young children, she knows how important it is to get a good night’s rest and has used the Reverie Sleep System throughout both of her pregnancy and postpartum periods with excellent results.

    Read more »
  • Daily Cycles in Women's Health
    Daily Cycles in Women's Health

    By Dr. Benjamin Smarr, PhD

    Think your body has just one biological clock? Or that sleep only minimally affects how your body works?  In this column, Dr. Ben Smarr takes his time and explains all.

    Daily Cycles in Women's Health

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    Read more »

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