1. A New Year of Better Sleep

    A New Year of Better Sleep

    When you think of the resolutions that usually end up on people’s lists for the new year—losing weight, exercising more, improving relationships, getting a promotion or a better job—it’s probably not often that you hear “sleep better” included. And that’s really a shame, because the health benefits of sleep are so crucial to our success in all different areas of life. What many don’t know is that consistently healthy sleep can actually help them achieve all of these different resolutions.

    Better sleep helps to:

    • curb your appetite

    • gives you the energy to exercise

    • makes you a more careful worker and a better team player

    • improves your mental health and stab

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  2. Getting Better Sleep During Chronic Pain

    Getting Better Sleep During Chronic Pain

    If you’re one of the millions of Americans suffering from chronic pain, you know that a good night’s sleep is hard to come by. In fact, you might not even remember the last time you experienced a halfway-decent night’s sleep.

    As is the case with most things that disrupt our sleep, the sleep loss resulting from chronic pain often begins a vicious cycle which only makes the source of the pain worse, causing even more sleep loss. If there’s one good thing that comes from recognizing this cycle, it’s that it shows us just how necessary good sleep is for good health.

    When we don’t get at least seven hours of consistent and uninterrupted sleep (as is often the case for those enduring chronic pain), we miss out on some of sleep’s most helpful benefits. The reason behind this has to do with t

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  3. Sleep's Role in Slimming Down

    Sleep's Role in Slimming Down

    If you’re currently trying or have tried to lose weight, you’ve probably heard ten times over the myriad best practices you should be following, but there’s probably a very simple one that’s been left out: getting a good night’s sleep.

    An estimated 160 million Americans are either obese or overweight, according to a recent study, which makes us the country with the highest proportion of overweight and obese people in the world, clocking in at 13% of the global total. Equally concerning, almost a third of Americans report that they are getting less than the recommended amount of sleep.

    Sleep scientist

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  4. Why We Feel Tired During the Day

    Why We Feel Tired During the Day

    Pssst—your boss isn’t looking over your shoulder, right? Good, time for some truth: do you ever feel….well, just a little….sleepy during the day? And maybe, possibly, you’ve felt your eyes getting just a bit heavy during that post-lunch meeting on the new standard operating procedures for logistics record-keeping?

    If this sounds like you, the truth is that you’re really not alone. According to the most recent survey on the subject, 76 percent of workers feel tired many days of the week, and 15 percent even fall asleep during the day at least once per week. In fact, a lack of sleep among the U.S. workforce costs approximately $41

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  5. Every Hour Counts: How to Deal With Lack of Sleep

    Every Hour Counts: How to Deal With Lack of Sleep

    If you have a sneaking suspicion that you’re not getting enough sleep every night, you can find a little comfort in knowing that you are definitely not alone. A recent study by the CDC states that 1 in 3 Americans are getting an insufficient amount of sleep, which means less than 7 hours of shut-eye a night.

    Losing more than sleep

    If you are one of the many Americans who are content if they can get five or six hours of sleep a night, you might think, “Well, what’s an hour more or less of sleep?” It turns out that hour can make an enormous difference. Spread out over months, years, or even (sadly) an entire lifetime, this condition is known as chronic sleep deprivation, and it comes with serious consequences,

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  6. Why Skimping on Sleep is a Major Career Mistake

    Why Skimping on Sleep is a Major Career Mistake

    There are a number of questions that an interviewer typically asks a potential candidate for a position.

    • “What relevant experience do you have?”
    • “Do you work better collaboratively or on your own?”
    • “What are your biggest strengths and weaknesses?"

    An increasing amount of data indicates that it would behoove hiring managers to add another question to their standard list: how well do you sleep?

    At first glance, it may not seem as relevant as a question about their skill set or a gap in their resume. But when it comes to the quality of work that employers can expect day in and day out, sleep quality matters. A lot.

    A Recipe for Disaster

    On the extreme end of things, the consequences of sleep deprivation can be seen in the nuclear disasters at

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