Reverie In The News 2018
  1. Reverie In The News 2018


    Here's what people are saying about Reverie out in the big wide world in 2018, with our most recent press coverage first. Click the link to read the story.

    OCTOBER 2018

    MyFitnessPal.com

    Dr. Amelia Bailey, a member of our Sleep Advisory Board, outlines sleep’s link to increased hunger in this article covering “5 Signs That You Need More Sleep”.

    Healthyway.com

    Our Dual Slumber pillow is included in this list on Healthyway.com covering the best healthy living products that can be purchased through Amazon.

    Domino.com

    Our CEO Martin-Rawls Meehan is featured in this article on popular home décor and lifestyle site Domino.com covering a whole host of tips and tricks for getting a great night’s sleep.

    FurnitureToday.com

    Furniture Today highlights the newest addition to our “Ask for Reverie” campaign—our awesome testimonials, featuring real people telling the stories of how our products have changed their lives.

    SEPTEMBER 2018

    MensHealth.com

    Our 4M adjustable foundation was a winner in the Men’s Health Sleep Awards 2018! You can find it covered in this article on the best sleep products on the market.

    SleepRetailer.com

    Sleep Retailer includes our new Sleep Coach™ program in a list covering the biggest trends in mattress retail today.

    FurnitureToday.com

    A new interview with our CEO Martin Rawls-Meehan details how Reverie is taking its commitment to great sleep global.

    The Sleep Retailer Podcast

    Editors from Sleep Retailer magazine recently sat down with our CMO Lisa Tan for their new Sleep Retailer Podcast.

    Shape.com

    A writer from Shape shares her experience of how our Sleep Coach™ program helped her deal with some of her unique challenges to getting a good night’s sleep.

    AUGUST 2018

    Reader's Digest

    In this back-to-school health checklist, our CEO Martin Rawls-Meehan details how parents can help their kids have the best school year possible by encouraging healthy sleep habits.

    Medium.com

    CMO Lisa Tan gives out some great advice and discusses what makes Reverie stand apart from the crowd, as well as the inspiration behind our new Sleep Coach™ program.

    EliteDaily.com

    Distinguished neurobiologist Dr. Benjamin Smarr, a member of Reverie's Advisory Board, is extensively quoted in this article about waking up before your alarm clock.

    JULY 2018

    Home Furnishing Business magazine

    Our very own CMO Lisa Tan was named to their Forty Under 40 List of top furniture industry executives. Everybody here knows this honor is well-deserved.

    Inc.

    A long feature article on Reverie Sleep Coach with our CEO Martin Rawls-Meehan.

    Bustle.com

    Reverie CEO Martin Rawls-Meehan talks about consistency as a key to getting better sleep.

    JUNE 2018

    Hellogiggles.com

    Reverie Advisory Board member Dr. Dawn Dore-Stites weighs in on how sleep is linked to migraines in this site dedicated to female empowerment, founded by Zooey Deschanel, Molly McAleer and Sophi Rossi.

    Yahoo Sports

    Reverie's new Sleep Coach™ program gets detailed coverage.

    MSN.com

    MSN does a short, fun news video explaining Reverie Sleep Coach.

    DigitalTrends.com 

    Reverie's revolutionary new Sleep Coach™ program gets a glowing writeup by this tech-focused site.

    TrendHunter.com 

    Reverie's new Sleep Coach™ platform is deemed a hot trend in this article.

    MAY 2018

    Bustle.com 

    Our CMO Lisa Tan talks to Bustle.com about sleep disorders and how they can affect relationships. 

    APRIL 2018

    Consumer Reports 

    Our CMO Lisa Tan is quoted in an informative article about power beds, aka adjustable bases. 

    MARCH 2018

    Women's Choice Award® 

    Reverie wins the award in two categories. Again. The award is based on what women owners say about our beds. Details here.

    Mini magazine

    Nice story on all the ways Reverie power beds are great for moms. Read it here. 

    Romper.com

    Reverie Advisory Board member Dr. Dawn Dore-Stites, a pediatric sleep expert, is prominently featured by Romper, a popular site for moms.

    Readers Digest 

    Reverie Advisory Board member Benjamin Smarr, PhD, gives insight on coping with daylight savings time in an in-depth article here. 

    FEBRUARY 2018

    USA Weekly

    Our CEO, Martin Rawls-Meehan is interviewed about the sleep biz.

    The Wall Street Journal

    Our busy and fearless CMO Lisa Tan makes the WSJ (with a full accompanying illustration!) where they discuss her preferred method for de-stressing. Check it out here. 

    JANUARY 2018

    Active Times

    CEO Martin Rawls-Meehan discusses high tech sleep with this fitness-focused blog. Story here.

    Credit.com

    Reverie's Chief Marketing Office Lisa Tan talks New Years resolutions and weight loss. Story here.

    CES 2018

    We went to CES, the prestigious Consumer Electronics Show, for our first time ever. And we made quite an impression with our technology and our mind-control bed.

    Innovation and Tech Today

    Their assistant editor checks out our mind-control bed and interviews us on video at CES.

    A top tech magazine gives us their CES Editor's Choice Award.

    Innovation and Tech Today magazine gave us their Editor's Choice Award for 2018. Story here.  

    Check out our CES video. 

    Reuters TV

    They go to CES and feature our bed in this episode. Reverie coverage starts at 2:15 in the video.

    Sleep tips with Tech Republic at CES.

    Video sleep tips from our CEO, Martin Rawls-Meehan. See video.

    Our smart bed with Tech Republic.

    Our CEO discusses how reading your brain waves will lead to better sleep in the future. See video.

    In-Style magazine

    Our CMO, Lisa Tan, gives advice on best sleep positions, depending on what your situation is.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

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  2. 10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions and how to get relief
  3. 10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions and how to get relief


    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    Motherhood, as you likely know if you’re reading this, is rewarding but not the bed of roses it’s often portrayed as. In fact, it can be pretty uncomfortable, painful or occasionally embarrassing, too. Here are a few conditions we can run into as we grow our little human, along with some ways to cope.

    #1 Morning sickness

    First of all, the person who named it morning sickness obviously never suffered from this condition.  It is actually morning, noon and night sickness. And it’s worst from 6-11 weeks of pregnancy. Try to eat small meals throughout the day. As long as you’re not a diabetic, it’s okay to eat more carbohydrates at this stage since that is what the pregnancy needs.  Listen to your body, and do not force yourself to eat. Btw, you are not actually eating for two–it is closer to eating for 1.01.

    10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions morning sickness

    #2 Round ligament pain

    This pain can occur throughout pregnancy.  It feels like a pulling in your side and can be pretty sharp.  This comes from stretching the ligament that runs from the top of your uterus into the vagina, which happens as your uterus enlarges to accommodate your growing baby.  The pain will usually go away if you shift positions.

    #3 Acid reflux and constipation

    Progesterone, the pregnancy hormone, slows your bowels down in order to extract as many nutrients as possible from the food you eat.  This is great for baby but tough for you (like so many other things). Drink plenty of water to help with constipation; but do this early in the day to minimize reflux.  Also, avoid consuming caffeine, chocolate, and acidic foods, which can worsen reflux. Raise the head of your adjustable power bed or sleep on several pillows to help with nighttime reflux.

    10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions acid reflux

    #4 Headaches

    This symptom worsened for me during both of my first trimesters.  I would drink plenty of water and eat something as a first step. Those may help, but occasionally I had to take Tylenol, which is safe in pregnancy as long as a doctor has not told you to avoid it.

    #5 Insomnia

    You may have difficulty sleeping due to hormone shifts during the first trimester, and you certainly will have insomnia due to physical discomfort in the third trimester.  Make your room as conducive to sleep as possible (dark, quiet, perfect temperature), and give yourself an extra hour to fall asleep. This will allow you to not become anxious if you have insomnia.  Also, try listening to soothing music or a meditation to help you fall asleep. Or just wait a few months- you will have no trouble falling asleep once the exhaustion of the newborn period sets in. During the third trimester, adjust your bed or use a pregnancy pillow to improve comfort while your body houses your little miracle.

    10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions insomnia

    #6 Stretch marks

    I start using lotion on my tummy during the second trimester.  Cocoa butter or an emollient cream works well. These do not have to cost hundreds of dollars- I bought mine at the drugstore.  Apply a thick layer all over the front and sides of your tummy before bedtime. I smelled like Easter candy while using the cocoa butter, but it worked!

    #7 Swollen feet

    As if you weren’t uncomfortable enough, during the third trimester your feet will start to swell due to baby’s size.  Prop your feet up as much as possible and wear compression stockings. If the swelling is rapid, you should go see your Ob/Gyn immediately as it could be a sign of increasing blood pressure.

    10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions puffy swollen feet

    #8 Breast tenderness

    This is a normal part of your pregnancy hormones surging, but it can be very uncomfortable.  Wear a tight-fitting but comfortable (think: no underwire) bra, maybe even a sports bra or camisole with shelf bra.  I even wore mine overnight to keep my anatomy in place while sleeping.

    #9 Lack of balance

    Your belly is growing (beautifully!), your hip bones are shifting, and you are exhausted.  It’s the perfect recipe for losing your balance, which could of course be dangerous to you and to baby.  When going from lying to standing, do so slowly. Relax in a sitting position for a few minutes before getting up to minimize the risk of dizziness.  Staying well-hydrated is helpful, too.

    10 uncomfortable pregnancy conditions balance

    #10 Recovery from delivery

    Your body has just endured the greatest work-out it will ever have, or you have just had major abdominal surgery, or both if you labored prior to a c-section.  Plus, you just finished growing another human. Be kind to yourself! Ask others for help taking care of your needs and baby’s needs. You may want to hold a pillow over your tummy while coughing or getting up after a c-section.  An adjustable power bed can also help you get out of bed without stressing those sore abs. If you had a vaginal tear during delivery, which is common, ask the hospital for a squirt bottle (squirt room temperature water before, during, and after urinating) and some numbing spray, and consider getting a donut-shaped pillow to sit on for a few weeks.

    Housing and then having a baby is not easy, but it is worth every sacrifice.  Best of luck, mama. You can do it!


    Having trouble sleeping while pregnant? Thinking ahead to getting rest once that baby is born? Check out this bed and take a look at our special blog for new and recent moms.

    Dr. Amelia Bailey Ob/Gyn

    Dr. Amelia P. Bailey is a Harvard-trained reproductive endocrinologist and infertility (REI) specialist in Memphis, Tennessee. She is the Director of Minimally Invasive Surgery for her practice and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. As the mother of two young children, she knows how important it is to get a good night’s rest and has used the Reverie Sleep System throughout both of her pregnancy and postpartum periods with excellent results.






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  4. Could I Have That? Style blogger Samantha Wennerstrom gets a Reverie bed.
  5. Could I Have That? Style blogger Samantha Wennerstrom gets a Reverie bed.


    First of a Three-Part Series

    Internet style celebrity Samantha Wennerstrom, known for her Could I Have That? brand, has many thousands of followers on social media, and is known for her impeccable taste. We had no idea that she'd been eyeing our bed for a while, so when she contacted us about a collaboration, we were surprised and happy.

    Samantha just moved into her amazing new home, and while she's unpacking, she had a luxury delivery ... her new Reverie bed. Check out her authentic impressions in this fun video. And stay tuned, because we'll be checking back with Samantha at 30 days and 60 days to see how her sleep progresses and to hear about her experience with Reverie's new Sleep Coach program.

    Read other reviews on the exact bed that Samantha has here. 

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  6. Up all night? Expert tips to help your newborn sleep.
  7. Up all night? Expert tips to help your newborn sleep.


    By Dr. Amelia Bailey, Ob/Gyn

    We teach our children how to do everything: eat, talk, play.  But do we remember to teach our children to sleep? That’s right ... sleep, while a natural part of our biorhythms, is still a behavior that needs to be cultivated.  Here are a few ways to ingrain this important skill starting from the time they're an infant.

    Start young.

    As soon as your baby is born, he desires a schedule.  Early on, that timetable is most closely attuned to feeding intervals; but sleep is a normal part of each full cycle of eating, interacting, and resting.  Granted, your little one may seem to fight you on this every step of the way. Remember that they are learning how to do every skill necessary for survival while becoming accustomed to multiple new stimuli.  Be flexible with the clock, but try to adhere to a predictable order in each cycle: feed, play, sleep, repeat. The amount of time taken to complete each cycle may fluctuate, but the pattern should be the same so your baby knows what she is expected to do next.  It is one of your first forms of communication with her.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Have a wind-down routine.

    Your body takes time to go from “full steam ahead” to “sleep” mode, and your baby’s body is no different.  Establish a set of steps that takes about fifteen minutes and signals to your newborn that sleepy time is nearing. There isn’t one right routine, so you may want to experiment a little at first. 

    What might a routine look like?

    At my house, I would give the baby a bottle at 6:30pm while we snuggle, then close the blackout curtains, turn on the sound machine, change her diaper, put on pajamas, and talk for a few minutes before setting her into her crib with her pacifier around 6:50pm.  She usually fell asleep by 7:00pm. Over this time, she had received non-verbal clues (physical, auditory, and visual) that it was her bedtime. Your child may need more cues or fewer, so tailor your evening routine to what works for your family. For example, your infant may fall asleep after a bath and massage with lotion whereas mine did not. You are the parent. You will learn your baby’s preferences quickly.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Be consistent.

    Once you establish a time and routine, stick to it.  Of course, illness and unforeseen circumstances will lead to occasional disruptions, but you are responsible for adhering to the schedule you set for newborn as frequently as possible. Type a document that you can easily update and print for other caregivers so they are prepared to follow the same rituals.  This will help your baby and the caregiver, both of whom want an easy night.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    When to see a doctor?

    Certainly, if your baby cries like he is in pain when you lay him flat or has bouts of projectile vomiting, you should call your pediatrician for a gastrointestinal evaluation. A small percentage of babies have sleep disorders, so if you implement a routine and your baby still is sleeping poorly after a couple months, you may want to have her evaluated for that.

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Sleep isn’t just for your baby.

    You need it too. Lack of sleep affects every area of health: intellectual, emotions, and physical well-being. For example, the immune system is less capable of fighting off infection when we are tired, which is certainly important if you have older children in school.  Create a relaxing place to rest in order to fall asleep faster and have more restorative sleep. A bed and pillow that support your body in any sleeping position as well as comfortable pajamas and bedding are essential. Top that off with a white noise machine and lavender sheet spray, and you are setting yourself up for success!

    Sometimes following these tips is hard. You want to snuggle longer, your little one does not want to go to bed yet, requiring you to put in more effort that night. Or activities and plans keep you out later than anticipated. That is okay. No one is a perfect parent; we are all just trying to do our best for our loved ones. Give your baby the gift of sleep, and your hard work will pay dividends.  Good luck!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    moms need sleep

    Up all night expert tips to help your newborn sleep

    Dr. Amelia P. Bailey is a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility (REI) specialist in Memphis, Tennessee.  She is the Director of Minimally Invasive Surgery for her practice and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.  She completed residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville, where she served as Chief Resident, followed by a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.  While in Boston, she was a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Medical School and conducted joint research projects between Boston Children’s Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    As an REI, Dr. Bailey treats patients who are having difficulty conceiving or who have complicated gynecologic conditions and follows women throughout early pregnancy.  Her expertise in sleep and women’s health, including pregnancy, stem from professional as well as personal interests.  As the mother of two young children, she knows how important it is to get a good night’s rest and has used the Reverie Sleep System throughout both of her pregnancy and postpartum periods with excellent results.



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  8. Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be
  9. Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be


    If you're pregnant or already a mom, you know that sleep is both the sweetest thing and the hardest thing to get at the same time. What if there was something that would help you get comfortable, something that would make your life a little easier every day and every night?

    You may have heard about power beds or adjustable bases before. Your grandma might have had one, and if so, you may be picturing an old clunky medical-looking device that sounds like a dying power drill when it moves. Well, it's like the power beds of old have aged backwards and got their braces off: today's models seamlessly blend into your Insta-worthy bedroom and are quiet when they move. They connect with your phone, some have massage, and they have life-enhancing, marriage-boosting positions like anti-snore. These aren't your grandma's power bases anymore. And let me tell you: they make every minute in bed more comfortable.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    SIX POWER PERKS FOR PREGNANCY AND BEYOND

    Find comfort with unlimited adjustability.

    Pregnancy is nine months long. That's 275 nights and 2,190 long hours if you're trying to get comfortable. A power bed gives you individual degrees of customizability: it's like having a couch that can be turned into a chair, a chaise, or a lounger at the touch of a button. We recommend zero gravity (which raises your feet and head to induce weightlessness) for side sleeping.

    Give relief to your swollen feet.

    Sure, during the day you might be cramming your new sausage feet into the last pair of shoes that still fits, but at the end of the day, you just want sweet relief. Forget the tipsy stack of throw pillows: with a power bed you can easily elevate your feet with a power base to reduce the swelling.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    Get the support you need after delivery.

    Your body is absolutely amazing—pregnancy is proof, but having a baby still does quite a number on a lot of areas down there. If you had a C-section, your body is recovering from both childbirth and a major surgery. In either instance, you can probably use all the help you can get. A power base gives remarkable support for your stomach and abs while getting in and out of bed for the umpteenth time.

    Feed your baby comfortably.

    Power beds turn your warm bed into a nursing chair in the middle of the night and make nursing or bottle feeding ten times easier. You can even get split or split-top mattress options so you can be feeding while your partner is still silently in anti-snore position next to you.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    Experience stress-relieving massage.

    If there were ever a stage of life to get extra stress relief from long days, the early stages of motherhood would be a perfect time. Many power beds come with massage options that have proven circulation-enhancing benefits.

    Why you need a power bed if you're a mom or mom-to-be

    Have a bed that fits your lifestyle.

    You probably use your bed for more than just sleeping: it might be your living room for reading or watching your favorite show, it's a table for breakfast in bed, it's the best spot for snuggling with your partner and your growing family. Power beds make those sweet, normal, everyday moments a lot more comfortable.

    Being a mom is no easy feat, and power bases make it just a little bit easier. 

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com

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  10. Dads Need Sleep Too
  11. Dads Need Sleep Too


    Any new dad will tell you that there’s nothing more magical and life-altering than the arrival of your new baby. Among the major adjustments new fathers face, the most taxing is a severe alteration to their sleep schedules.

    During the first 24 months of your child’s life, you will lose an average of six months of sleep. But it’s the first three to six months that will really be grueling with your newborn waking up every two to three hours demanding to be fed or have their diaper changed. Lucky for all you zombie dads, there are some easy ways for new fathers to cope with sleep deprivation.  

    Dad need sleep

    Give Yourself More Credit

    Most people assume that in a co-parenting couple, it’s the mom who loses more sleep during the earliest days of a newborn’s life. That assumption is especially understandable when you consider a woman’s role in breastfeeding and the fact that infants awaken at night every two to three hours. Alas, leave it to science to disprove our educated guess.  

    Studies have found that dads get less sleep than moms and experience more confirmed fatigue during the day. But before you text your wife this link announcing your plans to sleep in tomorrow, we should note that the same study showed that while new mothers received more sleep over the course of the day, that rest was disturbed more often. The takeaway is that you are both exhausted and it’s your duty as a new dad, partner and employee to find ways to cope.

    If you’re surprised to learn that you’re getting less sleep than your better half, consider this: it’s not just women who have strong neurological reactions to an infant’s cry. The sound of a baby crying (even one that’s not your own) triggers a heightened emotional response that’s almost impossible to ignore.

    It Takes a Toll

    Your newfound sleep deficit affects everything from your relationship to the U.S. economy. When you don’t get a good night’s sleep, you have a harder time reading emotions, making misunderstandings with your partner more frequent and harder to resolve.

    And remember our mention of the economy? Researchers in 2016 found that the U.S. economy loses $411 billion a year due to insufficient sleep. When you aren’t sleeping well, you’re an unproductive employee.

    Dads need sleep too

    You Can Make It Better

    The good news? You will get through this and eventually your baby will sleep through the night. Until that happens though, it’s important to find ways to cope. Here are some ways to improve your sleep:

    1. Take turns with the baby.

    Unless you’re bottle-feeding, you won’t be able to pitch in as well as you’d like when it comes to night feedings. Do your best to establish a routine that ensures you are both getting sleep. Maybe that means sending your better half to bed early while you stay up late until the first feeding, or rising early to let mom snooze.

    This is also a great time to start using that extra guest room if you have one. Whichever one of you is on deck can rest in the spare room to ensure your better half is getting uninterrupted sleep. You’ll soon discover what works for you both, but the important part is to communicate openly and be consistent.

    2. Get a white noise machine.

    Newborns make noise when they sleep, even when they’re not crying. Adding a white noise machine to your sleep routine helps ensure that you don’t awaken to every little squeak and sigh. Still sleeping with the baby in your room? You’re in luck—white noise machines benefit the quality of baby’s sleep as well.

    3. Take a cat nap.

    A 20-minute nap can work wonders in restoring your brain functions midday, making you a more productive employee. If your office has a nap room, use it. If they don’t, consider having a conversation with your boss about dedicating some space to a little shut-eye.

    Dads need sleep too4. Avoid the midday caffeine boost.

    Caffeine has a half-life of five to seven hours in humans. If you have a cup of coffee after 3 p.m., your body won’t fully be rid of the caffeine until 1 a.m. or later. Foregoing that extra cup of coffee in the afternoon may feel painful in the moment, but will pay off later when you’ve fallen asleep faster. If your brain’s really struggling to let go of its afternoon reward, try filling the void with a short afternoon walk or treat yourself to a square of chocolate.

    5. Put your phone down.

    Your phone’s blue light messes with your melatonin production, reducing your body’s urge to fall asleep. Additionally, being on your phone means you’re more likely to be checking your email, which gets you thinking about work and worrying over tomorrow’s responsibilities. The best thing you can do is put your phone down and save it for the next morning.

    Dads need sleep too

    Armed with a little extra knowledge, we hope that you start catching some extra sleep and reap the rewards in all aspects of your life. Keep up the good work, dads, and enjoy this special time with your little one. Before you know it, they’ll be 15 years old and sleeping until noon every weekend.


    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    Dads need sleep too




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  12. New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people feel more alert
  13. New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people feel more alert


    A recent Michigan State University study showed that Reverie’s 3D-Wave massage goes well beyond the obvious feel-good benefits during the massage. Namely, using it for 30 minutes at bedtime can help you wake up feeling happier and more alert. And those effects last well into the day.

    A quick recap on the massage itself

    Our 3D-Wave technology is truly revolutionary. Using the scientific principle of resonant frequency, we developed a more dynamic massage with a circular motion not found on other massage furniture. It’s also gentler and quieter. No crude shaking of the bed or bruising shiatsu. Just a travelling, zen motion that increases blood flow and circulation. And because we’re Reverie®, we designed it so you can adjust it to your own needs. Up to four wave patterns at your beck and call, plus 10 levels of intensity. We have a short video explaining more here.

    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people stay more alert

    The methodology, in human-speak

    So here’s how the study went down. Male and female college students were studied for approximately 24 hours. One group of participants slept with a 30-minute 3D-Wave massage at bedtime, and the other group did not. Both groups were given cognitive tests before going to bed to establish a baseline and also given standard physiological tests throughout the night to track their sleep quality.

    Upon waking, they were evaluated across several measures. They were asked about their quality of sleep, and given another cognitive test. They rated their initial alertness and mood. Once they left the clinic and went about their normal lives, they were then texted every two hours throughout the day and asked to keep rating their  alertness and mood.

    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people stay more alert

    What happened?

    The group that had the massage was compared to the group that didn’t. And the results were heartening. People who had used Reverie 3D Wave™ massage the night before woke up feeling happier. Better yet? The effects were not fleeting. Those who had 3D-Wave massage were more alert throughout the day and also in a better mood.

    New study shows 3D-Wave™ massage helps people stay more alert

    What does it mean for you?

    Sleep is a complex thing. It is different for all people, and at Reverie, we view it as a puzzle to be solved on many fronts. For a long time, we’ve felt massage helped, and now we have some objective proof. Massage is just one of many things we invest a lot of energy into to help you succeed at great sleep.

    There’s really no way to go wrong with our 3D-Wave massage. It feels amazing, and many of us who sleep on the bed ourselves feel strongly that it helps us fall asleep. This study also supports the idea that it will help you feel happier and less tired all day long. At Reverie, this truly makes us happy. Our tagline is “Sleep well tonight. Live better tomorrow.” We mean it, and hope that you experience life-changing sleep every night.

    For our data hounds:

    Here’s the science behind the study:

    - EEG, EOG, EKG, respiration and oxygen levels measured to determine sleep quality.

    - Stanford Sleepiness Scale to measure alertness.

    - UNRAVEL computerized place-keeping test to measure cognitive fitness.

    - PANAS test to measure mood.

    This study was funded in part by Reverie and by a grant from the SCIP/TCA program from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms

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  14. New Parent? You Have Permission to Nap
  15. New Parent? You Have Permission to Nap


    Unless you plan on becoming a Navy SEAL, the sleep deprivation you experience as a new parent will likely be the most severe you ever encounter. Need proof? During the first 24 months of your child’s life, a survey revealed you’ll lose an average of six months’ sleep.

    One of the best things you can do for your overall wellbeing during this incredible period of your life is to take daily naps. For most of us, the last nap we had was some time during our senior year of college, but for new moms and dads, we encourage a short daily nap as often as possible.

    Sleep makes everything better

    The recommended amount of nightly sleep for adults is seven to nine hours. Whether you’re doing all the nightly feedings yourself or dividing them up with your better half, you’re not going to meet that nightly quota during the first few months of your child’s life. That means you’re going to be exhibiting signs of sleep deprivation.

    A person deprived of sleep experiences more than just a tired body. In one study published by the Journal of Neurobiology and Circadian Rhythms, researchers found that sleep-deprived individuals had trouble identifying facial expressions of happiness and sadness.

    It’s not only your capacity to recognize other people’s emotions that suffers. When you’re not getting enough sleep, your ability to express joy in your face and voice is also impaired.

    Enter the benefits of a nap.

    Napping does a body good

    A short cat nap (we’re talking no more than 20 minutes) improves your mood and cognitive abilities. Naps do everything from restoring alertness to reducing accidents and creating feelings of rejuvenation.  

    New Parent You Have Permission to Nap

    Get the timing right

    Most experts recommend taking either a short 20-minute nap or completing a normal adult sleep cycle, which lasts 90 minutes. Anywhere in between or over that timeframe, and the napper will awake in a groggy state, which for our purposes is not what we’re after. Unless you’re certain your baby will snooze for an hour and a half, you may want to play it safe and set your alarm for 20 minutes.

    If you’re a stay-at-home parent, then the best advice is to nap when the baby naps. Both stay-at-home and working parents should try to avoid napping past 3 p.m. as it may affect your ability to fall asleep later that night.

    Ditch the stigma

    Napping is viewed as somewhat taboo in American culture, often creating perceptions of laziness. If you’re a stay-at-home parent, then you may feel guilty or judged for napping instead of doing the housework, and if you’re a working parent, then you might worry that your boss and coworkers will think you’re slacking off.

    The truth is you’re going to be a more productive and relatable person if you nap during the first couple years of your child’s life. You are 100% allowed to let the dishes and laundry pile up during this time in your life, but you must take care of yourself in order to take care of your baby.

    New Parent You Have Permission to Nap

    Ask for help

    We know, we know. As a new parent, you want to feel like you have it all together (or just mostly together). But here's a little secret: nobody does! It's totally OK to ask for help. Call a friend or family member to come over and hold your adorable baby while you take a nap. They'll likely be thrilled you asked, and it gives you some much-needed rest. Think of it this way: if your friend called you with this request, you'd be happy to help. Know they would do the same for you.

    Happy napping, everyone!

    Pregnant? New parent or have small kids? Tired? Get tips and info on our special site for exhausted moms. 

    Ready to start sleeping better?

    momsneedsleep.com exhausted moms


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