1. How to make the most of Daylight Saving Time this year

    How to make the most of Daylight Saving Time this year

    The leaves are changing, the mornings are frostier, and there’s pumpkin spice everything everywhere you look—which can only mean that the end of daylight saving time (also mistakenly known as daylight savings time) is right around the corner. This year, DST comes to an end on Sunday, November 3rd at 2 a.m., which is when our clocks will “fall backwards” and go back an hour. With this, we gain an extra hour of sleep that night.

    You’re probably looking forward to this extra bit of shut-eye, and rightly so—an hour of sleep is a very powerful thing! Raising your nightly amount of sleep from just six to a full seven hours actually rewards you with a number of noticeable physical and mental benefits. There is perhaps no greater demonstration of what an hour of sleep can do than the

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  2. The Most Common Types of Sleep Disorders

    The Most Common Types of Sleep Disorders

    For most of us, getting a good night’s sleep comes down to simply making the right choices and setting sleep as a high priority in our lives. For a large number of adults in the U.S., though (an estimated 50-70 million to be exact), the poor quality of their sleep stems from a sleep disorder beyond their control.

    It's an unfortunate fact that so many of those with a disorder go without a diagnosis because they don’t realize that they have a problem, or they simply believe that there’s no treatment for their particular issue. Some disorders can have a very substantial impact on the amount of sleep that someone is able to get (and thus on their health overall), so it is extremely important that they catch the disorder early on and begin treatment.

    These are just a few of the most common sleep disorders that are good for everyone to re

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  3. How to Make Sleep a Family Priority

    How to Make Sleep a Family Priority

    Families share everything. From their genes down to their sense of humor, children take their cues from their parents. But there’s one personal trait that we may not realize is affecting our families. You guessed it—our sleep habits.

    In order for your household to function at its best, sleep has to become a family priority. Let’s talk about the importance of sleep for your family and discuss how you can improve it for everyone.

    How much sleep should everyone be getting?

    For adults, the recommended amount of nightly sleep is seven to nine hours. For children, it depends on their stage of development. Here’s a breakdown of the number of hours of sleep required per day, including naps:

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  4. Bedtime Consistency: The Cure For Monday Mornings

    Bedtime Consistency: The Cure For Monday Mornings

    Picture this: You fly from New York to Los Angeles on Friday night and start adjusting to Pacific time. On Sunday night, you catch a red eye and abruptly fly back to the east coast: where waking up at 7 a.m. for a Monday morning meeting feels like 4 a.m. to your body. Sounds miserable, doesn’t it?

    Well, if you’re like a lot of people, this is exactly what your body is being put through every time you stay up late on the weekends and then try to adjust to a 9-to-5 schedule on Monday. This concept is called “social jetlag” because it’s often a result of socializing on the weekends, and the impacts of chronic fatigue and drowsiness very closely resemble jetlag.

    Our bodies crave consistency, and so they’ll try to esta

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  5. A New Year of Better Sleep

    A New Year of Better Sleep

    When you think of the resolutions that usually end up on people’s lists for the new year—losing weight, exercising more, improving relationships, getting a promotion or a better job—it’s probably not often that you hear “sleep better” included. And that’s really a shame, because the health benefits of sleep are so crucial to our success in all different areas of life. What many don’t know is that consistently healthy sleep can actually help them achieve all of these different resolutions.

    Better sleep helps to:

    • curb your appetite

    • gives you the energy to exercise

    • makes you a more careful worker and a better team player

    • improves your mental health and stab

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  6. Asleep at the Wheel: The Danger of Drowsy Driving

    Asleep at the Wheel: The Danger of Drowsy Driving

    If you take a second to think about it, you can probably recall quite a few PSAs you’ve seen on the dangers of drunk driving and driving while distracted by your phone—but when was the last time you saw one on the dangers of driving while tired? Nothing really comes to mind, right? In fact, this may actually be the first time you’ve ever stopped to consider this particular driving hazard.

    So why isn’t this issue part of any media campaigns? You might think the answer is because it’s such a small problem that it’s not worth the effort, but the reality is that drowsy driving is just as dangerous as drunk driving (if not more). An answer probably much closer to the truth is that fatigue and tiredness is simply so widespread in our population that driving under that condition is considered by most to be a regrettable but minor consequence. But the effects of drowsy driving are anything but minor.

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  7. Getting Better Sleep During Chronic Pain

    Getting Better Sleep During Chronic Pain

    If you’re one of the millions of Americans suffering from chronic pain, you know that a good night’s sleep is hard to come by. In fact, you might not even remember the last time you experienced a halfway-decent night’s sleep. As is the case with most things that disrupt our sleep, the sleep loss resulting from chronic pain often begins a vicious cycle which only makes the source of the pain worse, causing even more sleep loss.

    When we're prevented from getting at least seven hours of consistent and uninterrupted sleep by issues such as chronic pain, we miss out on some of sleep’s most helpful benefits. 

    Chronic pain and sleep stages

    Throughout a full night of sleep, our brains cycle between two phases, called non-REM and REM sleep (REM stan

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  8. The Buzz About Caffeine

    The Buzz About Caffeine

    To many of us, caffeine is like a superhero—swooping in to save us from the drowsy morning or mid-day slump and carrying us through the rest of the day. What we tend to forget in all of our appreciation of the trusty caffeine buzz is that it is a stimulant drug—and a very powerful one at that. While this substance does an awesome job of pumping us up mid-afternoon, it has terrible effects on our sleep later on. But wait!—before you close this page, grab your grande and run, let us tell you why and how you can drink coffee while still protecting your sleep.

    Stubborn caffeine

    Caffeine sticks around in your system for a while. Caffeine has a half-life of roughly five to six hours. What does that mean for you? Say you drink a grande coffee at 4 p.m. (cloc

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  9. A Pill-Free Approach to Better Sleep

    A Pill-Free Approach to Better Sleep

    For those that struggle with insomnia (or even with milder forms of “I just can’t sleep”), the list of solutions is slim and even dangerous. The most popular treatments are sleeping pills, but the negative impacts of sleeping pills don’t seem to have been widely publicized.

    Currently, sleeping pills do not have the ability to naturally imitate sleep. Instead, they more closely resemble a sedative rather than mimicking natural sleep patterns. Put more simply: when people use sleeping pills, they aren’t getting any of the necessary restorative benefits of sleep. And to go one step further: sleeping pills are tied with earlier death across the board.

    So where does that leave a bleary-eyed sleeper in the middle of the night

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